Hungarian Radiology

[Quality insurance in radiology]

FEHÉR Lászlóné

JUNE 20, 2006

Hungarian Radiology - 2006;80(03-04)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Renal cystic lesions The importance of CT in diagnosis and management in correlation with Bosniak classification]

AL-ABSI Mohammed, QAIS Abdulmalik, AL-NONO Ibrahim, GHILAN Abdulilah, GAFOUR Abdul Mohammed

[OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of CT in differentiating renal cystic masses of surgical causes from those of non-surgical masses. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The patients included in this study were collected from a private diagnostic center and university hospital prospectively, yielding a total of 55 analyzable renal cystic lesions. A careful helical CT abdomen focusing on the kidneys with intravenous contrast was obtained from all patients. The lesions were categorized into surgical and medical renal cystic masses using the Bosniak classification system supported by histology reports and follow up protocols for medical cases. RESULTS - Of 55 cases, 35 were classified as surgical (13 lesions as category IV and 22 as III) and 20 as medical cases (15 as category II and 5 as III). Out of 22 resected category III lesions 15 were found to be malignant and all categorized as type IV were malignant. No malignancies have been identified in the prospectively monitored group of patients. CONCLUSION - Our series results are comparable with other teaching institution series, and support the usefulness of the Bosniak classification system in separating renal cystic lesion into surgical and non-surgical lesions but with diagnostic categorization difficulty of complicated multilocular hydatid cysts versus neoplastic (category III) cystic masses.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Radiological diagnosis of lung cancer - 2005 Literature review Onco Update 2005]

BALÁZS György

[Our aim is to review the radiologic literature of lung cancer of 2004 and some remarkable publications from 2003. There are three main groups in the recent publications dealing with lung cancer’s radiology. The first group comprises those reviews and metaanalyses which focus on the overall utility and reliability of routinely applied modalities such as CT and MRI. In the second group we find original articles reporting on the experience with new modalities. This group is dominated by publications dealing with positron emission tomography and the first clinical results of combined PET-CT technology. In the third part we review those articles dealing with lung cancer screening. Radiological lung cancer screening is in the focus of interest again, mainly due to the introduction of low-dose CT which is undoubtadly the most sensitive radiological modality for the early detection of lesions, however, its clinical utility is debated. The papers referred are basically sceptic, but this is not the end, because controlled long term follow-up studies are still in progress. Part of the publications report on the first clinical results of new methods, while others give valuable additional data regarding the performance of “well established” radiological modalities.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Markusovszky memorial session]

GÁSPÁRDY Géza

Hungarian Radiology

[Scientific session on the 85th Anniversary of the Clinic of Radiology in Debrecen]

MÓZES Péter

Hungarian Radiology

[Advisory Meeting of the European radiographers]

VANDULEK Csaba

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[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

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In aging societies, the morbidity and mortality of dementia is increasing at a significant rate, thereby imposing burden on healthcare, economy and the society as well. Patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life and life expectancy are greatly determined by the early diagnosis and the initiation of available symptomatic treatments. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have been the cornerstones of Alzheimer’s therapy for approximately two decades and over the years, more and more experience has been gained on their use in non-Alzheimer’s dementias too. The aim of our work was to provide a comprehensive summary about the use of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer’s and non-Alzheimers’s dementias.

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[The importance of patient reported outcome measures in Pompe disease]

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[In recent decades it has become increasingly important to involve patients in their diagnostic and treatment process to improve treatment outcomes and optimize compliance. By their involvement, patients can become active participants in therapeutic developments and their observations can be utilized in determining the unmet needs and priorities in clinical research. This is especially true in rare diseases such as Pompe disease. Pompe disease is a genetically determined lysosomal storage disease featuring severe limb-girdle and axial muscle weakness accompanied with respiratory insufficiency, in which enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) now has been available for 15 years. In our present study, patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for individuals affected with Pompe disease were developed which included questionnaires assessing general quality of life (EuroQoL, EQ-5D, SF36), daily activities and motor performance (Fatigue Severity Score, R-PAct-Scale, Rotterdam and Bartel disability scale). Data were collected for three subsequent years. The PROM questionnaires were a good complement to the physician-recorded condition assessment, and on certain aspects only PROMs provided information (e.g. fatigue in excess of patients’ objective muscle weakness; deteriorating social activities despite stagnant physical abilities; significant individual differences in certain domains). The psychological effects of disease burden were also reflected in PROMs. In addition to medical examination and certain endpoints monitored by physicians, patient perspectives need to be taken into account when assessing the effectiveness of new, innovative treatments. With involvement of patients, information can be obtained that might remain uncovered during regular medical visits, although it is essential in determining the directions and priorities of clinical research. For all orphan medicines we emphasize to include patients in a compulsory manner to obtain general and disease-specific multidimensional outcome measures and use them as a quality indicator to monitor treatment effectiveness.]

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