Specialities

Cardiology

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 29, 2021

[When should antihypertensive be taken: in the morning and/or evening? Chronopharmacotherapy of hypertension in practice]

SZAUDER Ipoly

[The circadian (24-hour) variability of blood pressure (BP) is influenced by constant and variable (external and internal) factors. With this in mind and by determining the type of hypertension with a 24-hour blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), individual chronopharmacological (chronopharmacotherapy) treatment can be planned. There are significant differences in the chronokinetics of antihypertensive drugs administered at different times. Their therapeutic range and efficacy depend significantly on their circadian timing. Although the most modern antihypertensives have a 24-hour effect, they are not able to lower blood pressure at all times. Morning intake of ACE inhibitors, ARB-s, alpha-blockers mainly affect the afternoon and early evening rise, while evening intake reduces nocturnal and morning rise. Calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers (except carvedilol and labetolol), do not affect the circadian blood pressure profile. Therefore, in nondipper hypertension or in the case of morning rise, the twice daily morning and evening administration is more effective than the single morning administration. (Usually a lower dose is sufficient in the evening.) Adequate control of nocturnal or morning blood pressure elevations can be achieved with medication taken in the evening. According to the relevant studies the conclusion is that there is no convincing evidence that the administration of BP-lowering drugs in the evening provides any significant advantage in terms of quality of BP control, prevention of target organ damage or reduction of cardiovascular events, so evening intake only is not recommended. In particular the administration of antihypertensive drugs at bedtime, especially in the case of elderly patients may cause excessive BP fall at night with increased risk of silent cerebral infarct and the myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary heart disease.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 29, 2021

[Current evidence on the accuracy and precision of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring]

VÉGH Anna, REUSZ S György

[Purpose of review: Assessing cardiac output (CO) is an important part of monitoring the hemodynamically unstable patients. Different non-invasive CO measurement devices are currently available, that can be useful in various clinical situations. The purpose of this article is to review current literature on commonly employed methods especially regarding their accuracy and precision. Results: Most of the devices, especially the non-invasive ones have the disadvantage of questionable accuracy and precision. Generally speaking, the more a method is based on assumptions and mathematical models, the less precise it will be. There is also significant heterogeneity between individual studies. Clinically it is important to consider the purpose of the measurement before choosing a method. In terms of accuracy the most reliable ones are, the ones that are based on simple physical principles and minimal assumptions, for example transthoracic echocardiography, and thermodilution. Conclusions: To have better comparability between individual studies it would be imperative to have standardized study protocols regarding the number of cardiac cycles assessed, the used method, the clinical environment, the age and clinical condition of the study population.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 29, 2021

[Primary aldosteronism, the mysterious object of desire – in the context of a study]

BAJNOK László

[The aldosterone-producing adenoma, aldosteronoma, the actual Conn syndrome, is a relatively well-defined entity, while the separability of idiopathic hyperaldosteronism and low-renin primary hypertension appears to be inherently uncertain according to our current knowledge. In this way, the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism (PA) is in fact more or less probabilistic and this also contributes fundamentally to the uncertainty of prevalence data. These are confirmed by a recent study in which PA was evaluated in the form of 24- hour urinary aldosterone excretion measured with oral salt loading instead of the standard technique. The paper has contributed to the change of paradigm by which the chair of the most widely accepted PA guideline, renewed in 2016, called to be jettisoned much of it.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 29, 2021

[Case report of supine hypertension and extreme reverse dipping phenomenon decades after kidney transplantation]

BATTA Dóra, KŐRÖSI Zita Beáta, NEMCSIK János

[Supine hypertension, a consequence of autonomic neuropathy, is a rarely recognized pathological condition. Reported diseases in the background are pure autonomic failure, multiple system atrophy, Parkinson’s disease, diabetes and different autoimmune disorders. In our case report we present a case of supine hypertension which developed in a patient decades after kidney transplantation. The patient was followed for 25 months and we demonstrate the effect of the modification of antihypertensive medications. At the time of the diagnosis supine hypertension appeared immediately after laying down (office sitting blood pressure (BP): 143/101 mmHg; office supine BP: 171/113 mmHg) and on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) extreme reverse dipping was registered (daytime BP: 130/86 mmHg, nighttime BP: 175/114 mmHg). After the modification of the antihypertensive medications in multiple times, both office supine BP (office sitting BP: 127/92 mmHg; office supine BP: 138/100 mmHg) and on ABPM nighttime BP improved markedly (daytime BP: 135/92 mmHg, nighttime BP: 134/90 mmHg). In conclusions, our case report points out that autonomic neuropathy-caused supine hypertension and extreme reverse dipping can develop in chronic kidney disease, after kidney transplantation. The modification of the antihypertensive medications can slowly restore this pathological condition.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

APRIL 23, 2021

[Benefits of SGLT-2 inhibitors: beyond glycemic control]

BALOGH Zoltán, SIRA Lívia

[In the recent years, according to international and Hungarian guidelines, in addition to lifestyle modification, metformin is the preferred initial glucose-lowering drug for most people with type 2 diabetes, if not contraindicated. Sodium glucose co­transporter-2 inhibitors have been shown to reduce progression of chronic kidney disease, or kidney failure, as well as the risk of hospitalizations for congestive heart failure and (mainly in secondary prevention) cardiovascular death in patients with type 2 diabetes. For major adverse cardiovascular events and for the renoprotection, there seems to be no class effect. On the other hand, a class effect of sodium glucose co­transporter-2 inhibitors is evident for hospitalization for heart failure. In this review the authors summarize novel data about sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors, and about their new perspectives in the near future.]

Hypertension and nephrology

FEBRUARY 24, 2021

[Sudden death – ECG – hypertension]

KÉKES Ede

[Sudden death (HH) is not only associated with coronary heart disease or heart failure, but is also present in hypertension, primarily associated with left ventricular hypertrophy, systolic pressure, and age. Co-morbidities of hypertension (diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and renal failure) contribute greatly to its development. HH occurs due to ventricular fibrillation, or asystole. The auther demonstrates depolarization and repolarization pathologies leading to HH and detectable on the ECG and their characteristic ECG patterns. He also emphasizes the importance of resting heart rate and heart rate variability.]