Therapeutic Specialities

Cardiology

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2020

[Early experiences in surgical treatment of thoracic disc herniation from posterior transdural approach at Neurosurgery Clinic Szeged University]

MÁRKOS-GERGELY Gellérd, WATFA Kerim, BALÁZSFI Márton, SZEGETI Andrea, BARZÓ Pál

[Background – Because of the rare occurrence of thoracic disc herniation and surgery needed treatment the used approaches and their efficiency are still subjects of discussions. In Hungarian practice, the most frequent explorations are costotransversectomy and laminectomy, but there are many other important methods available like thoracoscopic and posterior transdural approaches. This case report will present the benefits and the surgical procedure of posterior transdural sequesterectomy, carry out for the first time in Hungary at the Neurosurgical Department on Szeged University. Case presentation – A 50-year-old female patient with achondroplasic nanism has been operated several times since 2011. She suffered from a progressive, multi-segment affected degenerative discopathy and myelopathy. Finally in the background of the recurrent paraparesis was confirmed thoracic disc herniations at the levels of T8 and T9. The use of intraoperative electrophysiology was not feasable, because the earlier described cervical myelopathy. For this reason we used the posterior transdural approach, as the best and safest, visual control warranted technique. Conclusions – The posterior transdural approach offers an alternative option for experienced surgeons, furthermore in contrast with traditional, technically difficult to implement or special instrumentation demanding approaches this technique seems to be more efficient.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2020

Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral hAemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[A rare complication of a rare disease; stroke due to relapsing polychondritis]

KILIÇ ÇOBAN, EDA XANMEMMEDOV, ELMIR ÇOLAK, MELEK SOYSAL

[Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an episodic and progressive inflammatory disease of cartilaginous structures. Its diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features such as laboratory parameters, biopsy. Neurological complications occur in 3% of the cases and are classified as an important cause of death. The cranial nerve disorders are most common but hemiplegia, ataxia, myelitis, polyneuritis, seizures, confusion, hallucination and headache can also happen. The aetiology of central nervous system involvement is still unknown. Moreover stroke has rarely reported in these patients. The diagnosis of stroke is challenging because of its rarity among these patients. Perhaps vasculitis is the common underlying mechanism. Also meningitis and encephalitis can occur during the course of RP. A 44 year-old woman was admitted with uncontemplated left hemiparesis, redness, swelling, and tenderness of the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints of the right hand and the cartilaginous portion. White blood cell count, C-reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate were elevated. Vasculitis biomarkers were normal in our patient. Carotid and vertebral artery doppler ultrasonography, cranial and cervical MR Angiography were normal. Echocardiography showed a mild mitral valve prolapse and regurgitation. Our patient had the history of auricular polychondritis but she had not been diagnosed. Hemiparesis was her first neurological manifestation that led her to doctors for diagnosis. Our patient fulfilled the criteria of RP so no biopsy was needed. She was treated with oral prednisolone (80 mg/day) and aspirin (300 mg/day) and now she is on 10 mg prednisolone and 150 mg azathioprine. Two months later her physical and neurological symptoms returned to normal.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

Comparison of hospitalized acute stroke patients’ characteristics using two large central-eastern european databases

ORBÁN-KIS Károly, SZŐCS Ildikó, FEKETE Klára, MIHÁLKA László, CSIBA László, BERECZKI Dániel, SZATMÁRI Szabolcs

Objectives – Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the European region. In spite of a decreasing trend, stroke related mortality remains higher in Hungary and Romania when compared to the EU average. This might be due to higher incidence, increased severity or even less effective care. Methods – In this study we used two large, hospital based databases from Targu Mures (Romania) and Debrecen (Hungary) to compare not only the demographic characteristics of stroke patients from these countries but also the risk factors, as well as stroke severity and short term outcome. Results – The gender related distribution of patients was similar to those found in the European Survey, whereas the mean age of patients at stroke onset was similar in the two countries but lower by four years. Although the length of hospital stay was significantly different in the two countries it was still much shorter (about half) than in most reports from western European countries. The overall fatality rate in both databases, regardless of gender was comparable to averages from Europe and other countries. In both countries we found a high number of risk factors, frequently overlapping. The prevalence of risk factors (hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidaemia) was higher than those reported in other countries, which can explain the high ratio of recurring stroke. Discussion – In summary, the comparatively analyzed data from the two large databases showed several similarities, especially regarding the high number of modifiable risk factors, and as such further effort is needed regarding primary prevention.

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

[The propagation and semiology of focal epileptic seizures. case presentations to the insula. theoretical considerations]

BALOGH Attila, BALOGH Attila ifj.

[Study objectives – The developing of diagnostical examinations in epileptology provides new challenges in seizure semiology. On the analysis of seizures it is important to examine the mechanisms of their propagation. The brain connectivity (based on the neuroimaging), the shadowing of the movement of excessive neuronal activity (based on computerized EEG and MEG methods), the cognition of the physiological and pathological brain networks are the foot- stone of the epileptic seizure propagation. The investigators prove, by means of case demonstrations of the role of the network nodes and the role of the epileptic hubs in the seizure symptomatology. Methods – The preoperative, intra and postoperative data are analised of three insular and one parietal epileptic patients in point of view of their seizure symptomes. Complex neuroimaging, noninvasive and invasive electrophysiology, intensive long-term video-EEG monitoring, computerized EEG analysis, fuctional mapping, intraoperative corticography were used. The etiology were confirmed with hystology. Results – It is observed that on seizure semiology our patients plays the insula a double role. In some cases, it is the focus of insular seizures with their symptoms difficult to identify. However, in the majority of cases and as a consequence of its rich neural connections, the insula has a peculiar property in the evolution of the symptomatogenic features of seizures. This observations are developing new relationships between the mechanism of seizure propagation and its semiological consequences. Conclusions – On epileptological point of view there are brain structures which has peculiar role in the „designe” of propagation of the epileptic excitement. The numerous new methods in neuroimaging and neurophysiology allowed the connectomical examination of the epileptic networks. The role of the epileptic diathesis is approachable with the metholdology of the brain connectivity. Theoretically the node of the epileptic network consist of the potential pathes where the localised excessive excitement can propagete. The route where the actual seizure can go adhead is determined by the actual edpileptic propensity of the above mentioned potential pathes.]