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Hungarian Radiology

DECEMBER 20, 2007

[Abdominal and thoracal manifestations of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in children]

VÁRKONYI Ildikó, NYITRAI Anna, MAGYAROSY Edina, RÉNYI Imre, SZEBERÉNYI Júlia, KIS Éva

[INTRODUCTION - Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is a secondary disease of transplanted patients, usually with good response to reduction of immunsuppressive therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The lymphoproliferative disorder was diagnosed in four children among 139, renal, liver and lung transplanted patients. Clinical data (original disease, transplanted organ, age and time elapsed since transplantation at the diagnosis of the disorder) and imaging findings (chest X-ray, thoracal and abdominal computed tomography scans) were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS - Thoracal and abdominal forms were the most frequent manifestations of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in our patients. Following features have been diagnosed on imaging studies: multiple liver nodules (two cases), multiple nodules in the renal parenchyma (two cases), splenomegaly (two cases), bowel wall thickening (two cases). Retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph node enlargement was found in all patients. Thoracal manifestations were as follows: mediastinal lymphadenopathy (two cases), hilar mass (one case), multiple pulmonary nodules (one case). Renal rupture with perirenal hematoma in one case, hilar mass envolving the main bronchus in one case, hepatic abscesses necessitating drainage in one case, and bowel wall necrosis in one case were the complications of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder. CONCLUSION - Presenting symptoms are aspecific, often mimicking infection. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder has to be excluded if aspecific symptoms in a transplanted patient are present, or the patient does not react properly on antibiotics. First step investigations include chest X-ray and abdominal sonography. Neck, chest and abdominal CT are mandatory for detecting all manifestations, for staging the disease and to determine the best localization of obligatory biopsy.]

Hungarian Radiology

APRIL 10, 2005

[Radiological diagnostics of the pancreas neoplasms - Onco Update 2005]

FORRAI Gábor, BODOKY György

[Authors reviewed the recent results of pancreas tumour radiological diagnostics and the place of the imaging and interventional methods. Systematical review of the most recent articles were summarized (July 2003-December 2004) in the following subjects: the etiology and clinico-pathology, general diagnostic and therapeutical questions of early pancreatic neoplasms, abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, MR-cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound-guided cytology, percutaneous biopsy, positron emission tomography, positron emission tomography - computed tomography, special pancreatic tumours. Experiences about the pancreas diagnostic methods are accumulating year-to-year rapidly. Therefore the current examination algorithm is changing continuously. New diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are entering in the daily practice. These are the reasons why the up-to-date knowledge of the literature is mandatory.]

Hungarian Radiology

DECEMBER 20, 2003

[Small bowel perforation due to blunt abdominal trauma in case of an inguinal hernia]

GION Katalin, SÉLEI Ágnes, CSÁSZÁR József, PALKÓ András

[INTRODUCTION - The injury of fixed bowel loops occurs more frequently due abdominal trauma. Authors review the CT signs of bowel injury in conjunction of the presented case. PATIENTS, METHODS - The inguinal hernia of the male patient was present for approximately 30 years prior the abdominal trauma. Due to the trauma the fixed small bowel loop became perforated. CT examination, beside using the conventional methods established the diagnosis of bowel wall perforation and the site of the perforation was localized before surgery. CONCLUSIONS - CT provied additional information compared to X-ray and US in the localization of the lesion due to the blunt abdominal trauma.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2010

[Devic syndrome - case report, diagnostic and therapeutic principles]

ILJICSOV Anna, BARSI Péter, VÁRALLYAY György, TÁTRAI Erika, SOMFAI Gábor Márk, BERECZKI Dániel, RUDAS Gábor, SIMÓ Magdolna

[Neuromyelitis optica (NMO, Devic-syndrome) is a rare, relapsing autoimmun disease of the central nervous system, which is distinguished from other demyelinating disorders by a recently identified, specific autoantibody. By demonstrating the anti-aquaporin-4 IgG in the serum, a heterogenous group of syndromes can be defined, called NMO-spectrum. In the future, optical coherence tomography may support this diagnosis besides the clinical features, imaging examinations and presence of serum antibody. Early recognition and treatment can improve clinical outcome even in serious condition. Long-term immunosuppressive therapy is advised to prevent further relapses and to stabilize or improve clinical status. Hereby, we report a case of a 51-year-old woman, under treatment for 1.5 years. We summarize the up-to-date knowledge about the pathomechanism, diagnostic strategy and therapy of neuromyelitis optica. We review recent findings and the diagnostic value of a new, non-invasive ophtalmological examination, the optical coherence tomography. According to the first results, this method may be helpful in the early differential diagnosis of optic neuritis.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JUNE 20, 2005

[DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES IN HEAD AND NECK MRI]

GŐDÉNY Mária

[Digital cross-sectional imaging techniques, especially computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in the diagnosis of pathologic conditions affecting the head and neck. MRI, because of its superb soft tissue contrast resolution and multiplanar imaging ability gives the most information regarding the origin and the extent of a laesion, intracranial extension, perineural-, as well as bone marrow involvement and play key role in the management of different diseases. Careful observation of the characteristic radiological features usually leads to correct diagnosis, however, some of the lesions are not typical, looking very similar and can be difficult to differentiate from each other. The purpose of the present article is to provide an overview of the most common pathologic conditions examined with MRI.]

Hungarian Radiology

OCTOBER 20, 2004

[Radiologic imaging in the diagnosis and follow up of malignant lymphomas]

PETRI Klára, HORVÁTH Anikó, MOLNÁR Zsuzsa, VÁRADY Erika, SCHNEIDER Tamás, ROSTA András, GŐDÉNY Mária

[Certain viral infections, gene mutations and immune suppression are likely to play some role in the development of malignant lymphomas. The clinical stage at the time of diagnosis is a decisive factor of prognosis. The evaluation of the nodal and extranodal manifestation of the disease is performed by standardized imaging techniques. Most frequent extranodal manifestation involves the bone marrow, the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. Different imaging techniques are indispensable in monitoring the effectiveness of the treatment and in long term follow up.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JUNE 02, 2009

[99-mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computed tomography examinations in genetically determined neurometabolic disorders]

ARANKA László, AMBRUS Edit, VÖRÖS Erika, SVEKUS András, KÓBOR Jenõ, BEREG Edit, PALATKA János, PÁVICS László

[The aim of our study was to determine regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities in different types of enzymopathies. Patients and methods - Among the patients with genetically determined enzymopathies 3 patients had aminoacidopathies, and 11 had different types of encephalopathies, from which 10 had mitochondrial encephalomyopathy (MEMP), and 1 patient had hyperuricaemic encephalopathy. Besides the mentioned 14 patients, 1 had ceroid lipofuscinosis and another patient had tuberous sclerosis. The further distribution of the MEMP patients’ group was the following - 5 patients had MEMP with lactic acidosis, 5 had Leigh’s disease (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy), from which 1 had cytochrome-c-oxidase deficiency (COX). Additionally in all patients were performed cerebral MRI and SPECT examination 10 min. after intravenous administration of 20 Mbq/kg 99 mTc-HMPAO. Results - Fourteen out of 16 SPECT findings were pathologic, showing decreased focal frontal/temporal/temporoparietal cerebral blood perfusion. Aminoacidopathic group - all the 3 patients revealed pathologic signs from the aminoacidopathic patients’ group. Among them the ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) heterozygous female patient with left-sided hemiparesis caused by hyperammonemic stroke at 10 month-age, showed right sided temporoparietal, occipital and left frontal hypoperfusion, nearly 6 years after the cerebral vascular attack. This finding might be resulted because of diaschisis. Mitochondrial encephalo-myopathic (MEMP) group - all the four patients with MEMP and lactic acidosis showed focal hypoperfusion in the temporal region, while the perfusion was normal in the COX deficient patient and in 2 Leigh’s disease (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy) patients. In the remaining 1 Leigh’s patient frontotemporal hypoperfusion was found. In all patients there were non specific structural abnormalities detected by MRI - cortical and subcortical atrophy, and scattered demyelination foci. In the case of ceroid lipofuscinosis the MRI showed cerebral atrophy and cerebellar hypoplasia, and the SPECT showed right frontal and occipital hypoperfusion, bilateral parietal physiological riping process. The patient with tuberous sclerosis showed bilateral temporo-occipital hypoperfusion. Conclusion - 1. SPECT images demonstrated hypoperfusion rCBF changes in 14 out of all 16 patients. 2. Regional cerebral/cerebellar hypoperfusion was detected by SPECT in mitochondrial encephalomyopathies, with lactate acidosis and aminoacidopathies giving high informative value about the cerebral perfusion.]

Hungarian Radiology

OCTOBER 20, 2007

[Computed tomography brain perfusion in the management of acute stroke]

BAGI Róbert, SZABÓ Tünde, MONOKI Erzsébet

[INTRODUCTION - The multidetector CT-technology made the application of perfusion CT-examination in the diagnosis of vascular brain damages possible in recently. The purpose of this study was to introduce the method and to assess the importance of computed tomography brain perfusion in emergency patient care and early diagnosis of brain ischemia. PATIENTS AND METHODS - We perform brain perfusion examinations with a 2 slice multidetector computer tomography (General Electric Highspeed NX/i, 2004) in our hospital. We examined the results of native and perfusion CT of 27 patients who underwent CT brain perfusion examination during emergency patient care in our department between 2004 January and 2006 December. We also examined if the patients got systemic thrombolysation and the patients’ condition after therapy. RESULTS - The perfusion software can make quantitative colour maps of parameters (CBF, CBV, MTT) and can visualize mean value and percentil decrease of measuring parameters. There were 18 positive and 8 negative CTbrain perfusion examinations in the examined period. One examination was technically unvaluable. CONCLUSION - By measuring blood flow's decrease the CT-brain perfusion examination can separate the reversible and irreversible damage of brain parenchyma. The examination protocol of brain vascular damages are native CT-scan, postcontrast perfusion CT-examination and CTangiography by the recommendation of international literature. Despite the multidetector CT-s and CT-perfusion technic is available for years, the CT-brain perfusion examination is not a routine process in the emergency patient care in our country.]

Hungarian Radiology

APRIL 10, 2005

[Radiologic diagnosis of the diseases of the pediatric gynecology]

LÓRÁND Ágnes, HARKÁNYI Zoltán, LOVAS Györgyi, HÉJJ Ildikó

[The basic examination of the pediatric pelvic organs is the transabdominal ultrasound which provides useful information about the anatomy and the pathological changes and in the vast majority of cases it is sufficient for treatment planning and to establish the diagnosis. Additional examinations are needed in case of complex developmental anomalies, in suspition of tumor, in staging and follow up examinations of tumors. Among the modern imaging methods the use of CT and MRI can be considered. The authors described the most frequent diseases in their practice and gave a brief overview on anatomical and physiological basics which is necessary for the exact interpretation of the examinations.]

Clinical Neuroscience

AUGUST 20, 2003

[Positron emission tomography in presurgical localization of epileptic foci]

JUHÁSZ Csaba

[The success of cortical resection for intractable epilepsy of neocortical origin is highly dependent on the accurate presurgical delineation of the regions responsible for generating seizures. In addition to EEG and structural imaging studies, functional neuroimaging such as positron emission tomography (PET) can assist lateralization and localization of epileptogenic cortical areas. In the presented studies, objectively delineated focal PET abnormalities have been analyzed in patients (mostly children) with intractable epilepsy, using two different tracers: 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG), that measures regional brain glucose metabolism, and [11C]flumazenil (FMZ), that binds to GABAA receptors. The PET abnormalities were correlated with scalp and intracranial EEG findings, structural brain abnormalities, as well as surgical outcome data. In patients with extratemporal foci and no lesion on MRI, FMZ PET was more sensitive than FDG PET for identification of the seizure onset zone defined by intracranial EEG monitoring. In contrast, seizures commonly originated from the border of hypometabolic cortex detected by FDG PET suggesting that such areas are most likely epileptogenic, and should be addressed if subdural EEG is applied to delineate epileptic cortex. In patients with cortical lesions, perilesional cortex with decreased FMZ binding was significantly smaller than corresponding areas of glucose hypometabolism, and correlated well with spiking cortex. Extent of perilesional hypometabolism, on the other hand, showed a correlation with the life-time number of seizures suggesting a seizurerelated progression of brain dysfunction. FMZ PET proved to be also very sensitive for detection of dual pathology (coexistence of an epileptogenic cortical lesion and hippocampal sclerosis). This has a major clinical importance since resection of both the cortical lesion and the atrophic hippocampus is required to achieve optimal surgical results. Finally, the author demonstrated that in patients with neocortical epilepsy, FDG PET abnormalities correctly regionalize the epileptogenic area, but their size is not related to the extent of epileptogenic tissue to be removed. In contrast, complete resection of cortex with decreased FMZ binding predicts good surgical outcome suggesting that application of FMZ PET can improve surgical results in selected patients with intractable epilepsy of neocortical origin.]