Lege Artis Medicinae

[Tuberculous meningoencephalitis in a toddler child]

REISZ Zita, GÁL Péter, TAJTI Zsanett, TERHES Gabriella, URBÁN Edit, KISS Ildikó, BARZÓ Pál, KIS Dávid, SENONER Zsuzsanna, SZABÓ Nóra, SZAPPANOS Norbert, TISZLAVICZ László

MARCH 20, 2016

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2016;26(03)

[INTRODUCTION - Central nervous system complications occur in 1% of patients with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, but the mortality is very high, about 50 percent. CASE REPORT - A 1-year-old child in tenebrous condition was admitted to the hospital with suspicion of meningitis. MRI detected disseminated encephalitis and dilated ventricles. Examination of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid didn’t bring any results. The microscopic examination of the brain biopsy raised the possibility of tuberculous meningoencephalitis, and the culture and PCR from the brain tissue revealed meningoencephalitis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing. DISCUSSION - Tuberculous meningitis is a very rare, but severe consequence of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Due to the high mortality, early diagnosis and whenever suspected, the use of empiric antituberculotic therapy are the only chances of recovery.]

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