Lege Artis Medicinae

[The age of transplantation]

FRENKL Róbert

OCTOBER 30, 1991

Lege Artis Medicinae - 1991;1(16)

[During the last week of August, Budapest hosted the 8th World Organ Transplant Games, or in 11 simple words, the Transplant Olympics. Two years ago, the seventh edition was held in Singapore, when our country was awarded the right to host the event. The Hungarian participation in Singapore was supported by the National Institute for Health Protection and its predecessor, the National Institute for Health Education, and the Health Protection Fund. Even then, there were - and there are certainly still - those who objected to this. The debate is eternal. Why should we spend relatively large sums of money on a few people travelling to far-flung places to play sport and compete, and why should we not spend the money on ensuring that many people at home can enjoy the pleasure and benefits of physical exercise.]

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Further articles in this publication

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[The questions of cardiac rehabilitation are reviewed evaluating own personal experiences and pertaining current literature. The authors touch upon the question of early mobilization, as well as supervised and non supervised exercise. The criteria for the implementation of coronary angiography and acute revascularization procedures in the early phase of myocardial infarction are established. They review the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction and the effects of rehabilitation training on the patients prognosis.]

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[Problems of organ transplantation - donor care]

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[The development of the definition of brain death which is fundamental in cadaver organ removal for transplantation purposes is reviewed. Brain stem death, an alternative term for brain death is based primarily on clinical findings namely the irreversible cessation of cephalic reflexes and spontaneous breathing. Hypothermia, metabolic and endocrine abnormalities, prolonged muscle relaxant, sedative or hypnotic drug action should be excluded. The early recognition of potential donor and the maintenance of basic life function at the Intensive Care Unit and the operating theater are essential for the good function of the transplanted organs. Normal homeostasis should be maintained by ensuring adequate fluid intake, good circulation and urine output. Brain death potential donors can exhibit persistent spinal reflexes and spontaneous movement wich may be erroneously interpreted as signs of life. The problem of the determination of brain death under 4 year of age is also discussed although law does not allow to use them as potentional donors in Hungary. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[A review of a three year period in general practice]

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[The author summarizes his work as a general practicioner in a village of 2000 people. He aimed to construct racional conditions of health care using technical, educational and organizing tools. Patients are reported to be satisfied and positive tendencies appeared in medicamentum consumption, and the number of sick days decreared from 13 673 to 10 198 per year. Less consultations of specialists and ask for hospital admission war performed. Indispensability of computers in the management of general practice is stressed. ]

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[Having got a district]

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[A beginner young general practicioner summarizes the experiences of his first year of work. Complex preparation for this work at the university, and the build up of the new practice of basic health service is described. Care of hypertension and diabetes is detailed, as an example how important and difficult is to reorganise this part of the work. The first year of experience gives a good possibility to look over the lack of undergraduate teaching This type of data collection and critical analysis seems to be necessary for a better planning of the forthcoming medical work. ]

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[Current knowledge of Chlamydia pneumoniae, a newly recognized Chlamydia species that causes acute respiratory infection is summarized. Microbiology, classification and the laboratory diagnosis of the organism are discussed. Serological studies in Hungary suggest that almost everyone is infected during lifetime and reinfection is common as well. The organism appears to spread from human to human. Tetracyclin or erythromycin is recommended for the treatment of the Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. ]

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