Lege Artis Medicinae

[RIO-Europe]

MATOS Lajos

NOVEMBER 19, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(11)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Health status and costs of ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary]

PÉNTEK Márta, GULÁCSI László, RÓZSA Csilla, SIMÓ Magdolna, ILJICSOV Anna, KOMOLY Sámuel, BRODSZKY Valentin

[Background and purpose - Data on disease burden of multiple sclerosis from Eastern-Central Europe are very limited. Our aim was to explore the quality of life, resource utilisation and costs of ambulating patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary. Methods - Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed in two outpatient neurology centres in 2009. Clinical history, health care utilisation in the past 12 months were surveyed, the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the EQ-5D questionnaires were applied. Cost calculation was conducted from the societal perspective. Results - Sixty-eight patients (female 70.6%) aged 38.0 (SD 9.1) with disease duration of 7.8 (SD 6.7) years were involved. Fifty-five (80.9%) had relapsing-remitting form and 52 (76.5%) were taking immunomodulatory drug. The average scores were: Expanded Disability Status Scale 1.9 (SD 1.7), EQ-5D 0.67 (SD 0.28). Mean total cost amounted to 10 902 Euros/patient/year (direct medical 67%, direct nonmedical 13%, indirect costs 20%). Drugs, disability pension and informal care were the highest cost items. Costs of mild (Expanded Disability Status Scale 0-3.5) and moderate (Expanded Disability Status Scale 4.0-6.5) disease were 9 218 and 17 634 Euros/patient/year respectively (p<0.01), that is lower than results from Western European countries. Conclusion - Our study provides current inputs for policy making and contributes to understanding variation of costof- illness of multiple sclerosis in Europe.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hungarian dialysis statistics: changing trends in the renal epidemiology]

KULCSÁR Imre, KISS István, SZEGEDI János

[In the last 30-35 years, dialysis care in Hungary has been a major development: both the incidence and prevalence of patients have increased year by year. Over the last decade, growth has slowed and is becoming more and more stabilized (similar trends can be seen in dialysis statistics in developed countries). Behind the dialysis indication the acute kidney injury (AKI) is more common than the end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The latter incidence has been stable for last 6 years (200-230 patient/million population). The annual average growth rate of prevalent dialysis patients was only 0.9%/year in the last 6 years. Among prevalent dialysis patients, the proportion of diabetic patients has remained unchanged for 10 years (26-27%), but those have increased who had hypertension nephropahty. The average age of incident and prevalent dialyzed patients has decreased gradually over the past 8 years (between 2009 and 2017 incident rate was from 67.1 to 63.0 years, prevalent rate was from 65.6 to 61.8 years). Unfortunately, just over half of the patients who dialyzed due to chronic kidney disease (CKD) have reached dialysis day 91. This is due to the high proportion of patient who was in urgent need of dialysis. In chronic hemodialysis (HD) program, the proportion of patients treated with arterovenous fistulas (AVF) decreases, while the rate of central venous catheter (CVC) users increases. The Hungarian peritoneal dialysis program in Europe is very good. The number of prevalent patients receiving renal replaement therapy (RRT) in Hungary in 2017 was 1005 for 1 million inhabitants.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[INCIDENCE RATES OF CHILDHOOD TYPE 1 DIABETES WITHIN EUROPE AND HUNGARY BASED ON EURODIAB DATA]

GYÜRÜS Éva, SOLTÉSZ Gyula

[Type 1 diabetes is generally believed to be be the result of an immune destruction of pancreatic ßcells in genetically susceptible individuals exposed to environmental risk factors. To study the epidemiology of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus in Europe, the EURODIAB collaborative group established in 1988 prospective geographicallydefined registers of new cases diagnosed under 15 years of age. The 10-year-old study shows a greater than 10-fold range in incidence rate of childhood diabetes in Europe. The standardised average annual incidence rate during the period 1989-1998 ranged from 3,6 cases per 100 000 per year in Macedonia to 43,9 cases per 100 000 per year in Finland. Combined data from all centres indicates that the annual rate of increase in incidence was 3,2% but in some central and eastern European countries it was higher. The age-group-specific rates of increase were 5% for children aged 0-4 years, 3,7% for 5-9 years, and 2,1% for 10-14 years, which shows that the highest rates of increase occurred in the youngest age group. The Hungarian Childhood Diabetes Registry has collected the data of all newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes aged 0-14 years since 1st January 1978. The standardised incidence rate during the period 1978-2002 was 8,6 cases per 100000 per year, the lowest in the youngest (0-4 yr), highest in the10-14-year-old-children. There was a linear increasing trend in incidence with the average rate of annual increase of 5,1%. Comparing our incidence rate with other European countries Hungary belongs to the medium-risk countries with similar age- and sex-specific incidence rates. The results of the EURODIAB study confirm a very wide range of incidence rates of childhood type 1 diabetes within Europe and show that the increase in incidence varies from country to country. Such variation seems to be unlikely to be explained by genetic differences, since Europeans (except some small populations) are more homogeneous compared with other populations of other continents. The rapid increase in incidence may be explained by changes in environmental factors.]

Clinical Oncology

[Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma - today]

VÉGH Éva, DEMETER Gyula, BODOKY György

[The hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the main causes of cancer-related death globally, and at the same time, it is the main event leading to death in cirrhotic patients. In the etiology of HCC, the non-alcoholic liver disease may be an important cause besides the viral cirrhosis. The HCC’s staging systems (Child-Pugh scores, Cancer of the Liver Italian Programme/CLIP, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer/ BCLC) play an important role in predicting the prognosis and determining the appropriate therapy. In Europe, the treatment strategy is based on the BCLC staging system. Screening of cirrhotic patient is also important because curative therapy is available only for the early-stage HCC. Several therapeutic options exist in the intermediate stage disease; among them the radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and the percutan ethanol injection (PEI) are most important. For the advanced disease, the only approved systemic therapy is sorafenib, which has been well-tolerated and yielded a substantially relative improvement in overall survival. For patient in end-stage disease with impaired liver function or a poor performance status, only supportive care is recommended.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]