Lege Artis Medicinae

[RIO-Europe]

MATOS Lajos

NOVEMBER 19, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(11)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Health status and costs of ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary]

PÉNTEK Márta, GULÁCSI László, RÓZSA Csilla, SIMÓ Magdolna, ILJICSOV Anna, KOMOLY Sámuel, BRODSZKY Valentin

[Background and purpose - Data on disease burden of multiple sclerosis from Eastern-Central Europe are very limited. Our aim was to explore the quality of life, resource utilisation and costs of ambulating patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary. Methods - Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed in two outpatient neurology centres in 2009. Clinical history, health care utilisation in the past 12 months were surveyed, the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the EQ-5D questionnaires were applied. Cost calculation was conducted from the societal perspective. Results - Sixty-eight patients (female 70.6%) aged 38.0 (SD 9.1) with disease duration of 7.8 (SD 6.7) years were involved. Fifty-five (80.9%) had relapsing-remitting form and 52 (76.5%) were taking immunomodulatory drug. The average scores were: Expanded Disability Status Scale 1.9 (SD 1.7), EQ-5D 0.67 (SD 0.28). Mean total cost amounted to 10 902 Euros/patient/year (direct medical 67%, direct nonmedical 13%, indirect costs 20%). Drugs, disability pension and informal care were the highest cost items. Costs of mild (Expanded Disability Status Scale 0-3.5) and moderate (Expanded Disability Status Scale 4.0-6.5) disease were 9 218 and 17 634 Euros/patient/year respectively (p<0.01), that is lower than results from Western European countries. Conclusion - Our study provides current inputs for policy making and contributes to understanding variation of costof- illness of multiple sclerosis in Europe.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Comparison of hospitalized acute stroke patients’ characteristics using two large central-eastern european databases

ORBÁN-KIS Károly, SZŐCS Ildikó, FEKETE Klára, MIHÁLKA László, CSIBA László, BERECZKI Dániel, SZATMÁRI Szabolcs

Objectives – Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the European region. In spite of a decreasing trend, stroke related mortality remains higher in Hungary and Romania when compared to the EU average. This might be due to higher incidence, increased severity or even less effective care. Methods – In this study we used two large, hospital based databases from Targu Mures (Romania) and Debrecen (Hungary) to compare not only the demographic characteristics of stroke patients from these countries but also the risk factors, as well as stroke severity and short term outcome. Results – The gender related distribution of patients was similar to those found in the European Survey, whereas the mean age of patients at stroke onset was similar in the two countries but lower by four years. Although the length of hospital stay was significantly different in the two countries it was still much shorter (about half) than in most reports from western European countries. The overall fatality rate in both databases, regardless of gender was comparable to averages from Europe and other countries. In both countries we found a high number of risk factors, frequently overlapping. The prevalence of risk factors (hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidaemia) was higher than those reported in other countries, which can explain the high ratio of recurring stroke. Discussion – In summary, the comparatively analyzed data from the two large databases showed several similarities, especially regarding the high number of modifiable risk factors, and as such further effort is needed regarding primary prevention.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Europe’s highest COVID-19 mortality experienced behind the former iron curtain]

RIHMER Zoltán

[While 11 out of the 15 first European countries with highest COVID-19 mortality rates are Post-Socialist countries (73%), and only 9 out of the 31 countries on place 16-46 (29%) are Post-Socialist. All of the top 17 European countries with the highest cumulative excess-mortality since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic era, are Post-Socialist countries (100%) as well as 19 out of the top 20 (95%). The dividing line between high and low COVID-19 mortality of European countries follows exactly the path of the former Iron Curtain. In addition, out of the 43 data reporting European countries, all the 18 with the lowest vaccination rate (100%) are Post-Socialist. The main cause of these differences in European COVID-19 mortality may be the traditionally disadvantageous physical and mental condition of the population of Post-Socialist countries, but this problem needs further, more intense investigations.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Utilization of acute vascular imaging and neurointervention for acute ischaemic stroke patients in 20 Hungarian stroke centers

POZSEGOVITS Krisztián, SZABÓ Géza, SZUPERA Zoltán, NAGY Péter, NÉMETH László, KONDÁKOR István, TUSA Csaba, BERENTE László, SALACZ Pál, VÉCSEI László, SAS Katalin, SEMJÉN Judit, NIKL János, SZAPÁRY László, KAKUK Anikó, RÓZSA Csilla, HORVÁTH Melinda, IMRE Piroska, KÖVES Ágnes, BALOGH István, MOLNÁR Sándor, FOLYOVICH András, AL-MUHANNA Nadim, BÉRES-MOLNÁR Katalin Anna, HAHN Katalin, KRISTÓF Piroska, SZÁSZ Attila Sándor, SZŰCS Anna, BERECZKI Dániel

Background - Acute mortality rate of stroke in Hungary is significantly higher than in Western Europe, which is likely to be partially attributable to suboptimal treatment. Subjects and methods - We examined the use of acute vascular imaging and mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischaemic stroke patients. We collected data on 20 consecutive patients from Hungarian stroke centres before 31st August 2016. Results - Out of the reported 410 patients, 166 (40.4%) underwent CT angiography and 44 (10.7%) had mechanical thrombectomy. Conclusion - Only about 1/3 of acute ischaemic stroke patients eligible for thrombectomy actually had it. The underlying reasons include long onset-to-door time, low utilization of acute vessel imaging and a limited neuro­intervention capacity needing improvement.

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hungarian dialysis statistics: changing trends in the renal epidemiology]

KULCSÁR Imre, KISS István, SZEGEDI János

[In the last 30-35 years, dialysis care in Hungary has been a major development: both the incidence and prevalence of patients have increased year by year. Over the last decade, growth has slowed and is becoming more and more stabilized (similar trends can be seen in dialysis statistics in developed countries). Behind the dialysis indication the acute kidney injury (AKI) is more common than the end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The latter incidence has been stable for last 6 years (200-230 patient/million population). The annual average growth rate of prevalent dialysis patients was only 0.9%/year in the last 6 years. Among prevalent dialysis patients, the proportion of diabetic patients has remained unchanged for 10 years (26-27%), but those have increased who had hypertension nephropahty. The average age of incident and prevalent dialyzed patients has decreased gradually over the past 8 years (between 2009 and 2017 incident rate was from 67.1 to 63.0 years, prevalent rate was from 65.6 to 61.8 years). Unfortunately, just over half of the patients who dialyzed due to chronic kidney disease (CKD) have reached dialysis day 91. This is due to the high proportion of patient who was in urgent need of dialysis. In chronic hemodialysis (HD) program, the proportion of patients treated with arterovenous fistulas (AVF) decreases, while the rate of central venous catheter (CVC) users increases. The Hungarian peritoneal dialysis program in Europe is very good. The number of prevalent patients receiving renal replaement therapy (RRT) in Hungary in 2017 was 1005 for 1 million inhabitants.]