Lege Artis Medicinae

[Pain and opportunities for non-pharmacological pain management in intensive neonatological care]

ANDREK Andrea

JANUARY 20, 2011

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2011;21(01)

[Neonatal intensive care and therapeutic process is accompanied with a range of painful interventions. Research data from the past decades revealed that repeated and/or prolonged pain has long-term consequences on the neurobiological development of the premature infant, which has led to an increased attention to the measurement and alleviation of pain. In addition to pharmacological pain relief, more and more alternative pain management methods of varying efficacy are appearing in the provision of care for premature infants. In this study, we introduce non-pharmacological pain treatment methods with proven efficiency that can be applied to complement the pharmacological pain management or as a therapy before any painful interventions in intensive neonatological care. These methods include heart sound and music therapy, nutritive and non-nutritive sucking, swaddling, touching and kangaroo care.]

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