Lege Artis Medicinae

[Localised and generalised osteoporosis in autoimmune polyarthritis]

TÓTH EDIT

MARCH 20, 2002

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2002;12(03)

[In this article, recent data are summarised on the osteoporosis occurring in autoimmune polyarthritis. Involvement of the bone in patients with autoimmune diseases occurs in two forms: localised (around inflamed joints) and generalised. Paraarticular osteoporosis has been known for a long time but new methods of bone measurements highlight the rate and cause of bone loss. Generalised skeletal changes in rheumatoid arthritis, in systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile chronic arthritis have been proved by epidemiological studies. At present, there is no evidence supporting generalised bone loss in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Despite the fact that clinically apparent osteoporosis in autoimmune diseases is associated with severe health impairment and reduced survival rates, osteoporosis is still underdiagnosed and prophylactic strategies have yet to be found for this group of patients. These facts indicate calling specialists’ attention to the importance of osteoporosis in inflammatory diseases.]

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