Lege Artis Medicinae

[Dual diagnosis of addiction ]

SZEMELYÁCZ János

JANUARY 20, 2020

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2020;30(01-02)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33616/lam.30.006

[Psychopathology is significantly high among individuals with addiction problems compared to other populations. We look at the dynamic and nature of these correlations, and address the specific treatments of such comorbidities, as well as the vulnerabilities of professionals working in the field. Few typical cases of interactions between drug use and mental disorders will be presented to provide example of the complexity and importance of dual-diagnosis. ]

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