Lege Artis Medicinae

[DREAM]

HALMOS Tamás

NOVEMBER 19, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(11)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Are oppressive dreams indicators in bereavement?]

PUREBL György, PILLING János, KONKOLY THEGE Barna, BÓDIZS Róbert, KOPP Mária

[Objectives - It is widely believed that oppressive dreams are frequent in bereavement - despite the lack of scientific investigations of the subject. The aims of our study were the analysis of dream quality as well as the correlates of oppressive dreams in bereavement. Method - Participants with (N=473) and without bereavement were compared upon the database of a national representative study (Hungarostudy Epidemiological Panel Survey 2006, N=4329). Dream contents were assessed with the Dream Quality Questionnaire (DQQ). Depressive symptoms (BDI-S) and the presence anxiety were also investigated. Results - Oppressive dreams occurred significantly higher frequency in the first year of bereavement (men: F=17.525, p<0.001, women: F=8.291, p=0.004). Oppressive dreams were significantly associated with anxiety (F=37.089, p<0.001) and with depressive symptoms (F=50.562, p<0.001). Discussion - Oppressive dreams are significantly more frequent in the first year of bereavement, and may act as indicators of bereavement-linked mental health consequences like depression and anxiety. These are often masked by the symptoms of grief and therefore remain untreated. Our preliminary results could be a starting point for the development of further research aiming to clarify the relationship amongst dream contents, anxiety, and depression in bereavement.]

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[How do physicians sleep and dream?]

SUSÁNSZKY Éva, SZÁNTÓ Zsuzsa

[INTRODUCTION - Satisfying sleep is especially important for physicians. Our study analyses physicians’ sleep and dream from the point of view of continuous nightand- day duty. SAMPLE AND METHOD - Questionnaires were completed by 125 physicians among whom the proportion of night shift taking and only day-time working persons was equal. The questionnaire contained the Athens Insomnia Scale and the Dream Quality Questionnaire as well as questions about demographical characteristics and work circumstances. RESULTS - Almost each doctor mentioned sleep problems, principally daytime sleepiness (78%) and sleep deprivation (70%). Long sleep latency is reported more often by women doctors; the frequency of night awakenings increases, while daytime sleepiness decreases by age. The feeling of performance-loss is more prevalent among night shift takers. Dream characteristics differ significantly neither along demographical characteristics nor by work shifts. CONCLUSION - Although sleep problems are more frequent among physicians when comparing to the Hungarian general population, the frequency of clinical level insomnia is not higher. On the other hand, physicians can recall their dreams more often (25% vs 7%) and the emotional load of their dreams influence their daytime mood more commonly.]

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[About stem cells]

PAPP Csaba

[Stem cells are special cells of an organism that are capable to continuously renew themselves and, triggered by environmental effects, to differentiate and produce cells suitable for various functions. Due to their special characteristics, stem cells have an exciting potential to fulfil an old dream of physicians: to replace and regenerate damaged cells and tissues. Regenerative medicine has undoubtedly opened new vistas in medicine and provides hope for those with yet uncurable diseases. Here, we briefly describe different kinds of stem cells and their sources and discuss some of their experimental or clinical applications. Besides the bone marrow, which is now considered a traditional stem cell source, we present alternative sources. Among these, we pay special attention to the two stemcell sources that are important for obstetricians and gynaecologists: the umbilical cord (Wharton’s jelly) and the characteristics of the umbilical cord blood. We discuss some aspects of the storage of cord blood (”stem cell banking“) its potential use. Obstetricians and gynaecologists have an important role and a great responsibility in promoting the collection and, if necessary, the use of these stem cells. Communicating with patients and informing them about the their possible therapeutic applications stem cells is a part of this process as well as obtaining cord blood and preserving a segment of the cord. Obstetricians and gynaecologists should help to save as much as possible the umbilical cord and cord blood, which become ”redundant“ after birth but are a great source of multipotent mesenchymal and haemopoietic stem cells, which can be used in various fields of 21st-century medicine.]