Clinical Neuroscience

[Are oppressive dreams indicators in bereavement?]

PUREBL György, PILLING János, KONKOLŸ Thege Barna, BÓDIZS Róbert, KOPP Mária

JULY 30, 2012

Clinical Neuroscience - 2012;65(07-08)

[Objectives - It is widely believed that oppressive dreams are frequent in bereavement - despite the lack of scientific investigations of the subject. The aims of our study were the analysis of dream quality as well as the correlates of oppressive dreams in bereavement. Method - Participants with (N=473) and without bereavement were compared upon the database of a national representative study (Hungarostudy Epidemiological Panel Survey 2006, N=4329). Dream contents were assessed with the Dream Quality Questionnaire (DQQ). Depressive symptoms (BDI-S) and the presence anxiety were also investigated. Results - Oppressive dreams occurred significantly higher frequency in the first year of bereavement (men: F=17.525, p<0.001, women: F=8.291, p=0.004). Oppressive dreams were significantly associated with anxiety (F=37.089, p<0.001) and with depressive symptoms (F=50.562, p<0.001). Discussion - Oppressive dreams are significantly more frequent in the first year of bereavement, and may act as indicators of bereavement-linked mental health consequences like depression and anxiety. These are often masked by the symptoms of grief and therefore remain untreated. Our preliminary results could be a starting point for the development of further research aiming to clarify the relationship amongst dream contents, anxiety, and depression in bereavement.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Endoscopic, posterior transseptal pituitary surgery - Learning curve of the surgical technique and equipment in 61 operations]

BELLA Zsolt, FÜLÖP Béla, CSAJBÓK Éva, MAGONY Sándor, VALKUSZ Zsuzsa, HERCZEGH Szilvia, JÓRI József, BODOSI Mihály, CZIGNER Jenő, BARZÓ Pál

[Introduction - The removal of hypophyseal tumor by transsphenoidal pituitary surgery using microsurgical instruments was first performed over 100 years ago. Operating techniques for this surgery are constantly being renewed, first by using a microscope and later on with the use of an endoscop. The authors provide an overview of the minimal invasive posterior transseptal-transsphenoidal aproach with the combined utilization of classical techniques with the assistance of the endoscop. Method - Sixty-one patients (33 female, 28 male, 21-84 yrs) were treated for sellar region tumor resection using an endonasal transsphenoidal aproach with the help of an endoscop. Follow ups were performed within 2-21 months. Results - Total tumor resection was successful in 91.8%, and partial resection in 8.2% of the patients. The rate of complications using the endoscop method was not higher compared to that of the classical microscopic method. There was no major bleeding in any of the cases. Adverse events such as minor epistaxis occurred in 4.9%, transitional diabetes insipidus in 6.5%, inraoperative CSF leak in 16.67%, postoperative CSF leak in 11.5% and meningitis in 8.2% of the patients. After the operation the pathological hormonal production stoped in all patients except in two patients who were acromegalic. However their GH level normalized and they did not require further treatment, the IGF-1 still remained high. Conclusion - The success of the surgical treatment is based on both, the proficient pre- and postoperative endocrinological care, and the minimal invasive surgical technique. The endoscop was used partially or continuously during the operation for better visualization of the operation field in multiple angles (30°, 45°). It was useful in differentiating between normal and tumorous glandular tissue, and also offered an enhanced view of the intrasellar (via hydroscopy) and parasellar region. Moreover the endoscopic method is able to decrease the operating time, reduce blood loss. In different stages of the surgery, depending on the anatomical and pathological situation, switching back and forth from microscope to endoscop technique, gives us the benefit of a clearer view in each situation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurophobia]

SZIRMAI Imre

[Neurophobia is the fear of neurological diseases. Its main symptom is that medical students and young doctors are not able to utilize their basic neurological knowledge at the bedside. According to statistics, every second student suffers from neurophobia. This attitude could explain why in the last two decades less and less young doctors wanted to become neurologist. Medical students complain that they receive no instructions, and are afraid of loosing their interest and of facing the failure of their competency. The hardship of neurology was explained by the insufficient knowledge of anatomy and the infrequent encounter with patients. Even general practitioners have anxiety about neurological patients. The loss of interest in neurosciences seems to associate with insensitivity of human-centered culture and corruption of empathic thinking. The burnout syndrome of medical doctors and students can be explained by stress, loss of respect, permanent competition, independency that interferes with responsibility, stiff hierarchy of medical society, fear of diagnostic failures and of economical difficulties. The scores of depression in female students were higher than in male. The idea of the “good neurologist” has been changed. The business oriented care, the shortage of time, and the financial restrictions corroded the conventional practice and ceased the vocational idealism. At present, personal teaching is going to transform into impersonal multimedia learning. Because of the drastic change of values, the age of inner-oriented professionals has terminated also in the medicine. Medical doctors follow even less the traditional troll of professional behavior, but according the social demands, they choose their specialization for subsistence. The highly esteemed social status of neurologists and psychiatrists is going to sink in Europe. To reduce neurophobia it would be desirable 1. to introduce neurology training in the early years of medical school; 2. to teach neurology in all semesters, 3. to assure the effective teaching of neuro-anatomy and physiology, 4. to organize more one-to-one teacher-student communication. In the United States, residents participate in teaching during their residency training. To master neurology dedicated teachers are necessary whom neurology residents ought to meet personally with optimal frequency. However, these requirements seem to fail because of the chiefly technical characters of the actual reforms.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Recommendations for a brief international cognitive assessment for multiple sclerosis]

BENCSIK Krisztina

Clinical Neuroscience

[The absence of the common LRRK2 G2019S mutation in 120 young onset Hungarian Parkinon’s disease patients]

BALICZA Péter, BEREZNAI Benjámin, TAKÁTS Annamária, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DIBÓ György, HIDASI Eszter, BALOGH István, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Parkinson’s disease is a promising target of applying personalized medicine. For this purpose it is crucial to reveal the genetic and environmental factors, which contribute to the disease, also to collect epidemiologic data and to preserve the patients samples and data in a proper biobank. In our investigation we examined the prevalence of the most frequent Parkinson’s disease causing LRRK2 G2019S mutation in a Hungarian Parkinson-patient group. From 120 patients, we haven’t detected this substitution in anyone. Our investigation suggest that the mutation LRRK2 G2019S may be a rare cause of Parkinson disease in the Hungarian population.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Editorial comment]

KLIVÉNYI Péter

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Evaluation of anxiety, depression and marital relationships in patients with migraine

DEMIR Fıgen Ulku, BOZKURT Oya

Aim - The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of attacks in patients with migraine, to determine the effects of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and to evaluate the marital relationships of patients with migraine. Method - Thirty patients who were admitted to the neurology outpatient clinic of our hospital between July 2018 and October 2018 and were diagnosed with migraine according to the 2013 International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria were included in this cross-sectional study. Age, sex, headache frequency and severity, depressive traits, marital satisfaction and anxiety status were examined. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for measuring relevant parameters. Results - The mean severity of migraine pain according to VAS scale was 6.93 ± 1.41 and the mean number of migraine attacks was 4.50 ± 4.24. The mean BDI score of the patients was 12.66 ± 8.98, the mean MMQ-M score was 19.80 ± 12.52, the mean MMQ-S score was 13.20 ± 9.53, the mean STAI-state score was 39.93 ± 10.87 and the mean STAI-trait score was 45.73 ± 8.96. No significant correlation was found between age, number of migraine attacks, migraine duration, migraine headache intensity, and BDI, STAI and MMQ scores (p>0.05). But there was a positive correlation between MMQ-S and scores obtained from the BDI and STAI-state scales (p<0.05). Conclusion - In this study more than half of the migraine patients had mild, moderate or severe depression. A positive correlation was found between sexual dissatisfaction and scale scores of depression and anxiety.

Clinical Neuroscience

[EFFECTS OF ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS ON MOOD OF PEOPLE WITH EPILEPSY]

RAJNA Péter

[This article deals with the effect of antiepileptic drugs on mood when applied in epiletic patients. The author points that depressive symptoms occur significantly more frequently in epilepsy and there are more common factor in the mechanism of action of the antiepileptic and antidepressive agents. The relevant literature is surprisingly poor. Primary and large analysis regarding affective disorders coexisting with epilepsy is still lacking. From this aspect some antiepileptic drugs have not been investigated at all. The consequences of the papers originates from indirect sources like adverse events profiles of the study drugs or from psychometric tests performed for avoiding exclusion criteria of psychological nature. On the other hand the paper deals also with the difficulties of such kind of investigations concerning the classification of depressive signs presenting with epilepsy, special considerations of inclusion of appropriate patients and particular limits of the measuring and follow-up of the observed effect. As the result of the detailed analysis of the literature the author recommends lamotrigine, carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine as first choice antiepileptic drug for epileptic patients suffering from depressive disorder, too. On the contrary, phenobarbital, topiramate and vigabatrin are able to worsen the affective symptoms. Aimed, randomized, controlled studies are necessary for recognizing the whole spectrum of psychotropic effects of antiepileptic drugs and for their successful and individually tailored application in patients in their comorbide states. Author calls the attention for the importance of the treatment of depressive states frequently occurring in epileptic patients. These symptoms modify the compliance of the patients and are able to influence even the epileptic process itself.]

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PÉTER László, RIHMER Zoltán

[Psychiatric problems are a common comorbid condition in patients with cardiovascular disease. Depression is a well-known risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease and mortality too. Psychiatric and cardiovascular diseases are prevalent public health problems in the western world. Depression is associated with endo­thelial dysfunction and increased platelet aggregation, which may explain the consequent cardiovascular complications. Specific affective temperaments may be associated with special cardiovascular diseases. Antidepressant therapy does not only reduce depression but also cardiac mortality.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Modern health worries in patients with affective disorders. A pilot study

FREYLER Anett, SIMOR Péter, SZEMERSZKY Renáta, SZABOLCS Zsuzsanna, KÖTELES Ferenc

Background - Modern health worries (MHWs) are asso­ciated with various indicators of negative affect, conspiracy theories, and paranormal beliefs in healthy individuals. Purpose - The current pilot study aimed to assess MHWs and indicators of negative affect in patients with affective disorders (N = 66), as well as the possible associations between MHWs and paranoid and schizophrenic tendencies. Results - Compared to somatic patients, psychiatric patients showed higher levels of MHWs, somatosensory amplification, health anxiety, and somatic symptoms. Medium level associations between MHWs and paranoid (r = 0.35, p < 0.01) and schizophrenic (r = 0.37, p < 0.01) tendencies were also revealed. Somatosensory amplification (β = 0.452, p < 0.001) and paranoia (β = 0.281, p < 0.01) significantly contributed to MHWs in multiple linear regression analysis (R2 = 0.323, p < 0.001). Discussion - High (i.e. pathological) levels of negative affect can impact a number of related characteristics. Non-pathological paranoid tendencies might contribute to MHWs. The identification of paranoid tendencies seems to be relevant for the treatment of psychiatric patients exhibiting MHWs. Conclusion - Patients with affective disorders are characterized by higher levels of modern health worries, health anxiety, and somatosensory amplification. Modern health worries are associated with paranoid tendencies.

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[Depression from the aspect of polygenic studies: the role of the relationship between genes and the environment]

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[Depression is a multifactorial disease with both genes and environmental factors as well as complex relationships between these factors playing a role in its background. However, in spite of several decades of research no genetic variants playing a straightforward and robust role in the background of depression have been identified. One reason behind this is the genetic and biological heterogeneity of depression, while another is that in the majority of studies environmental effects interacting with genetic variants have not been considered which may mask important genetic effects. Furthermore, relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors may vary in case of different manifestations and subtypes of depression which has not only etiopathological relevance but may also influence choice and efficiency of treatment. Consideration of heterogeneity of depressive syndromes, as well as environmental effects in case of both candidate gene and whole genome association studies, and qualitative analysis of environmental effects in depression and antidepressant research may extend our existing knowledge concerning the pathophysiology of depression and may also aid identification of new antidepressive therapeutic targets. ]