Lege Artis Medicinae

[Arthrosis - An epidemic of the 21st century]

BÁLINT Géza

OCTOBER 21, 2007

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2007;17(10)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Famous “Anatomic” People]

Dr. GRÉTSY Zsombor

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The MR NOED study]

MATOS Lajos

Lege Artis Medicinae

[ADVANCE]

MATOS Lajos

Lege Artis Medicinae

[A Brief Compendium of Unusual Remedies Mesmerism]

dr. MAGYAR László András

Lege Artis Medicinae

[MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER]

TÍMÁR József, OSTOROS Gyula

[One of the most useful markers of non-small cell lung cancer is epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein expression. Recently it was found that the EGFR gene may be amplified or mutated in non-small cell lung cancer rendering this gene product an ideal target for therapy. The introduction of molecularly targeted therapy into the clinical practice represents a milestone in the management of non-small cell lung cancer. However, our knowledge on the prognostic and predictive factors that will define the efficiency of anti-EGFR therapy is limited. In clinical practice, some common patient and disease features (e. g., smoking habit, gender, histological type) are still more dependable predictors than the fine molecular properties that may directly affect therapeutic response. The indication of anti-EGFR therapy in Hungary is based on the immunohistochemical detection of the EGFR protein, therefore, it is important that these tests are performed as reliably as possible. On the other hand, mutations in the EGFR gene may render the tumour resistant or, in contrary, especially sensitive to EGFR inhibitor therapy. The sequence of the diagnostic steps to define the genotype and phenotype of non-small cell lung cancer has a great importance in terms of cost-efficiency of the therapy.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[ALDOSTERONE AT THE BEGINNING OF THE 21ST CENTURY]

GLÁZ Edit, SZŰCS Nikolett, VARGA Ibolya

[The discovery of aldosterone as the principal mineralocorticoid hormone led to a new era in the study of the regulation and the pathological/clinical relevance of the fluid-salt homeostasis and blood pressure. Here, we discuss briefly the history of the discovery of aldosterone, its biosynthesis, the mechanism of action, regulation and the diseases which are associated with its pathologically increased production and hypertension: primary and secondary hyperaldosteronisms. Considering their clinical significance, we focus on primary hyperaldosteronisms as they represent a considerable portion of secondary hypertensions that can be definitively cured. Differential diagnosis issues related to other forms of hypertension of different origins are discussed in detail. Recent findings of the past fifteen years indicate that besides its classical genomical actions aldosterone has much more diverse non-genomic actions as well including proinflammatory and profibrotic effects even in physiological concentrations. Based on these observations, aldosterone can be regarded as a risk hormone in the aetiology of cardiomyopathies, vasculopathies and neuropathies and therapeutical consequences are also discussed.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Epidemic among health care providers: burnout]

IRINYI Tamás, NÉMETH Anikó

[Aims of the study: To track the changes since 2008 in the degree of burnout among health care workers in Csongrád County, and to examine its connections with the evaluation of own health, frequency of psychosomatic symptoms, the intent to leave the profession, and the measure of fear from becoming unemployed. Methodology and sample: This is a cross-sectional study carried out through a self-designed self-report questionnaire sent to registered members of MESZK living in Csongrád County. Results: The number of burned-out health care workers increased since 2008. Burnout correlates with physical health (p<0.000), the intention to leave the profession (p<0.000), and the fear of losing the job (p<0.000). A significant increase could be observed by nurses starting their career. Conclusions: Burnout prevention trainings would be important also by career starters, which could also prevent profession leaving. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGENITAL CATARACTS FACIAL DYSMORPHISM NEUROPATHY SYNDROME - FIRST HUNGARIAN CASE REPORT]

SISKA Éva, NEUWIRTH Magdolna, REBECCA Gooding, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[The congenital cataracts facial dysmorphism neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome (OMIM 604168) is a recently described autosomal recessive developmental disorder. It is almost completely restricted to an endogamous group of the European Vlax Roma population, called the Rudari. The CCFDN syndrome is a complex phenotype involving multiple systems, characterized by facial dysmorphism, congenital cataracts, microcorneae, delayed early motor and intellectual development, hypogonadotrop hypogonadism, hypomyelination of the peripheral nervous system, and serious complications related to general anaesthesia. This disorder is caused by a homozygous mutation of the carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (CTDP1) gene, localized to the 18q23 region. Authors present one genetically identified case in a large Roma family. The case documents that the CCFDN mutation is present also in the Hungarian Roma population. Underlie of antropomorphological data the authors presume that the CCFDN mutation reached Hungary as a result of emigration of Vlax Gypsies in the 18th century. The paper calls attention to the fact that molecular genetic diagnostics can replace invasive methods and makes possible the identification of heterozygotes without clinical symptoms. The introduction of the genetic screening enables us to perform genetic counselling and prevention in this high-risk population.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[The Florence Nightingale Medal - Its History and the Hungarian Connection]

SÖVÉNYI Ferencné, PERKÓ Magdolna, Dr. FEDINECZNÉ VITTAY Katalin, BOROS Károlyné

[Apropos of the International Nurses Day, authors discuss Nightingale’s impact on the development of nursing and her role in international nursing history. They consider as one of the main achievements of Nightingale that she raised the profile of nursing to an appreciated profession, thereby contributing to modifying the widely held view on women’s role in society in Hungary, too. After reviewing the developments related to the educational empowerment of women in the Hungary of the 19th century they suggest that these changes as well as awakening of the nation might explain the decision of the Hungarian Red Cross Society to table a motion at the 8th International Conference of Red Cross Societies in London with a view to establishing a medal in honour of Florence Nightingale. The Hungarian proposal was approved by the international conference in Washington in 1912 and a resolution was passed to institute the Florence Nightingale Medal. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[BRAIN INSULIN SIGNALLING IN THE REGULATION OF ENERGY BALANCE AND PERIPHERAL METABOLISM]

MICHAELA Diamant

[The unparalleled global rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes, together with the associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, are referred to as the "diabesity pandemic". Changes in lifestyle occurring worldwide, including the increased consumption of high-caloric foods and reduced exercise, are regarded as the main causal factors. Central obesity and insulin resistance have emerged as important linking components. Understanding the aetiology of the cluster of pathologies that leads to the increased risk is instrumental in the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. Historically, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and liver were regarded as key insulin target organs involved in insulinmediated regulation of peripheral carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. The consequences of impaired insulin action in these organs were deemed to explain the functional and structural abnormalities associated with insulin resistance. The discovery of insulin receptors in the central nervous system, the detection of insulin in the cerebrospinal fluid after peripheral insulin administration and the well-documented effects of intracerebroventricularly injected insulin on energy homeostasis, have identified the brain as an important target for insulin action. In addition to its critical role as a peripheral signal integrating the complex network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and neurotransmitters that influence parameters of energy balance, central nervous insulin signalling is also implicated in the regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. This review summarizes the evidence of insulin action in the brain as part of the multifaceted circuit involved in the central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, and discuss the role of impaired central nervous insulin signalling as a pathogenic factor in the obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemic.]