Hypertension and nephrology

[Kidney transplantation in Hungary, 2010]

LANGER Róbert, TORONYI Éva

OCTOBER 20, 2010

Hypertension and nephrology - 2010;14(05)

[Hungarian kidney transplantation has been established with three milestone operations. In 1902 Emerich Ullmann showed the technical feasibility of renal transplantation on dogs, and later the living donor transplant of András Németh in 1962 and the program starting operation of Ferenc Perner in 1973 already meant the real possibility for Hungarian patients. More than 5000 kidney transplantations were done since, and the operations are now made at the four university medical schools centers. In 2009 248 renal transplantations were done in our country (Budapest: 148, Szeged: 51, Pécs: 39, Debrecen: 34), from which 24 were living donor and nine combined kidney-pancreas cases. Despite the worsening financing situation in the health care system the numbers of transplantations are stable within a 15 year period, but this means a marked decrease in international comparison. In our country, the ratio of living donation is low, there is no paired donation, incompatible transplantation, the problems of hypersensitive patients are unresolved, and there is no old-for-old program. The solution to all of these problems could be joining to Eurotransplant, which is the definite wish of the transplant society based on the positive Slovenian and Croatian examples.]

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[In this summary an overview is offered on the recent developments of the investigation and the treatment of hemolytic uremic syndrome. Based on the recent developments in the understanding of the pathogenesis and on the novel diagnostics there is an increasing ability to identify the etiology of specific diagnostic sub-groups of the disease. This molecular etiology-based classification and sub-group diagnosis has substantial influence on the short-term and long-term management of the affected patients. The first part of our review focuses on the steps of first and second line diagnosis and the selection between available therapeutic options, and provides flow-charts for the daily work. The various aspects of the long-term management and disease monitoring in hemolytic uremic syndrome will be reviewed in a second article in the future.]

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[Biological medicines of protein or polypeptide origin produced with biotechnology are far more complex in structure than the low molecular weight chemical ones. In conjunction with chemical drugs generic copies are completely the same, while in the field of biological medicines only similarity can be stated, as identical molecules cannot be produced. Spatial structure, isomers and side chains cause difference and for this reason these are called biosimilar drugs. Immunogenity of biosimilar drugs is very different and the risk of antibody production against them is diverse. Pure red cell aplasia, a rare side effect of erythropoietins is a life-threatening condition so every effort must be done for its prevention. Biosimilar drugs are not to be replaced with each other, and even the reference drugs should not be substituted in order to identify easily the side effects of each drug. Importantly financing should support these clinical principles namely a cheaper drug could be started as a new treatment but a former treatment should not be replaced because of cost sensitivity. It is important to provide the availability of the very expensive biologically active drugs to each patient but it is acceptable that the treatment should be as cost-effective as possible. Similarly to the generic copy program of chemical drugs biosimilar drugs are also important for the clinical practice, however their use needs appropriate regulation and farmacovigilance.]

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[Chronic kidney disease has profound effects on the health related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with serious physiological, psychological and socio-economic implications. The co-occurrence of protein-energy wasting (PEW) and inflammation in end stage renal disease patients is associated with worse HRQoL and increased mortality. We designed this study to examine the relationship between nutritional and inflammatory status and HRQoL in kidney transplant recipients. Data from 100 randomly selected kidney transplant patients were analyzed in a crosssectional survey. Socio-demographic parameters, laboratory results, transplantation related data, co-morbidities, medication and malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS) (Kalantar Score) were tabulated at baseline. Patients completed the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-SF (KDQoL-SFTM) self-administered questionnaire. Mean age was 51±13 years, median (interquartile range, IQR) time since transplantation 66 (83) months, 57% were males and 19% had diabetes. The median (IQR) MIS was 3 (3). MIS significantly and negatively correlated with almost all HRQoL domains analyzed, and this association remained significant in multivariate linear regression analysis for the log-transformed scores on energy/fatigue (β=-0.059, p<0.001), bodily pain (β=-0.056, p=0.004), physical functioning (β=-0.029, p=0.022), and symptoms/problems (β=-0.023, p=0.005) domains after statistical correction for age, gender, eGFR, dialysis vintage, Charlson Comorbidity Index and occupational status. Additionally, cubic spline analyses revealed linearly increasing, “dose-response” relationship between almost all domains of KDQoL-SFTM and the MIS. Malnutrition Inflammation Score is independently associated with different dimensions of health related quality of life in kidney transplant recipients.]