Hungarian Radiology

[Radiotherapy]

MÓZSA Szabolcs

JUNE 20, 2002

Hungarian Radiology - 2002;76(03)

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Hungarian Radiology

[The guest of the guest]

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NAGY Gyöngyi

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PALKÓ András

Hungarian Radiology

[Remarks from the President Elect - A debate initiating letter to the members of the Society]

PALKÓ András

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[MR-guided ultrasound surgery]

JÓLESZ Ferenc A., BÉRCZI Viktor, HÜTTL Kálmán, REPA Imre, HYNYNEN Kullervo

[The powerful union of focused ultrasound surgery and magnetic resonance imaging has created a new approach to noninvasive surgery. Using this integrated therapy delivery system the physician can achieve correct localisation of tumors, optimal targeting of acoustic energy, real time monitoring of energy deposition, and the means to accurately control the deposited thermal dose within the entire tumor volume. The advantages of MRI over ultrasound guidance in controlling focused ultrasound surgery lie in the more sensitive detection of tumor target, the real time detection of tissue temperature, and the confirmation of thermally-induced tissue changes - powerful features that eventually can replace the traditional surgical approach. Applying software that connects the therapy and imaging system, the physician can generate an entire plan from quantifying temperature changes to positioning the therapy transducer. The non-invasive debulking of tumors without disturbing adjacent, functionally intact structures is thereby accomplished. Ongoing clinical trials involving the treatment of breast fibroadenoma, localized breast cancers, and uterine fibroids have been most encouraging. But nowhere has the application of MRI-guided focused ultrasound surgery been more compelling than in brain, where not only tumor treatment is possible but also the focal, transient, reversible breakdown of the blood-brain-barrier. The implications of this mechanism for targeted intra-cerebral tumor therapy or other non-oncologic applications are clearly enormous. In addition to tumor treatment, MRI-guided focused ultrasound surgery has other potential clinical applications such as vascular occlusion, targeted drug delivery, and targeted gene therapy. FUS is not a new idea but the emergence of MRI based guidance has accelerated the progres of focused ultrasound surgery technology, certain weaknesses remain including excessively long treatment times, body and organ motion, and difficulties in finding acoustic windows at certain anatomic locations. Nevertheless, the successful clinical implementations of this method is already in progress.]

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[To assess sexual function, functionality and quality of life in women with cervical cancer. Descriptive, cross-sectional, quantitative, non-random, purposive sampling of women (N=91) with FIGO stage I/II/III cervical cancer, more than 5 months after last treatment. The study used standard questionnaires with self-designed questions. Data were analysed using Microsoft Excel, descriptive and mathematical statistics (p<0.05). Completers who received radiotherapy scored significantly higher in functional status (p<0.05) and emotional function than those who did not receive radiotherapy (p<0.05). Completers with lower levels of emotional well-being were significantly more likely to have lower levels of sexual function and higher levels of gynaecological problems (p<0.05). Women affected by cervical cancer often experience somatic and psychological disturbances that reflect on quality of life associated with the disease and treatment.]

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[According to Hungarian guidelines, valproate - with the exception of infants and small children as well as fertile women - is the first drug of choice in generalized and unclassified epilepsies because it is effective in most seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. It is highly effective in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Even though it is not the first-line drug in focal epilepsies, if the first-line therapy is ineffective, it is a plausible alternative as second choice therapy, owing to its different mechanism of action. If the type of epilepsy can’t be surely established, valproate is the drug of choice, as it possesses the broadest-spectrum among antiepileptic drugs. After administration of benzodiazepines, intravenously applied valproate can be a first choice therapy in all types of status epilepticus, owing to its broad-spectrum and efficacy. Valproate is the first-choice therapy in patients with glioblastoma - independently of the seizure type -, as it is likely to improve the survival rate with 2-10 months and the effectivity of chemo- and radiotherapy. Valproate is generally not suggested for fertile women, but - as it is the most effective therapy in some epilepsy syndromes -, the patient has the right to choose valproate therapy, thus undertaking the elevated risk of developmental abnormalities, for higher safety regarding seizures. If only valproate therapy owns the ability to obtain seizure freedom, then stopping its administration is not suggested, but a low dosage has to be aimed (500-600 mg/day, but not more than 1000 mg/day): according to some studies, most idiopathic generalized epilepsies can be controlled by low valproate dosage. Stopping valproate therapy in case of an ongoing pregnancy is not suggested. ]

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Evaluation of ischemic stroke patients with systemic cancer

UFUK Emre, TASKIN Gunes, IREM Pinar, FURUZAN Kokturk, ESENGUL Liman, ORHAN Yağiz

Purpose - In cancer patients, an ischemic stroke can be seen as both a direct effect of cancer and a complication of treatment. This condition can negatively affect the follow-up and treatment of these patients. For this research, we aimed to evaluate the clinical features, stroke types and etiological features of ischemic stroke patients with histories of cancer or found to have cancer during the aetiological investigation. Materials and methods - We retrospectively evaluated 100 patients (57 males, 43 females) who were hospitalized with acute stroke and determined to have the presence of cancer or a cancer history during the aetiological investigation between 2011 and 2016. All the demographic features, stroke types and localizations, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, Rankin Scale scores, durations of cancer and cancer treatments were recorded. Results - The mean age of the patients was 67.07 ± 10.9 years old, the median NIHSS score was 5, and the median Rankin Scale score was 4. While 79% of patients had ischemic stroke risk factors, 21% did not. Atherosclerotic stroke was the most common stroke type (49%, n=49) and cryptogenic strokes were detected in 21% (n=21). In addition, 63% of the patients had chronic cancer (later than 6 months), 31% of the patients had recent cancer histories (less than 6 months), and 29% of the patients had metastases. Among all the malignancies, lung cancer (n=23), gastrointestinal cancer (n=20) and gynaecological-breast cancer (n=16) were the three most common. Moreover, 37% of the patients underwent chemotherapy, 29% underwent radiotherapy, and 88% of the patients had Carotid/Vertebral Doppler USG abnormalities. Conclusion - Similar to what is stated in the literature, an atherosclerotic stroke was the most common type of stroke in the cancer patients. Stroke risk factors were not detected in 21% of the patients, and in the majority of the patients, atherosclerotic changes in the carotid artery were observed in the Doppler examinations. In the aetiology and prognosis of ischemic stroke, it is important to keep in mind the existence of cancer in addition to the classical stroke risk factors.

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[F-DOPA PET/MR based target definiton in the 3D based radiotherapy treatment of glioblastoma multiforme patients. First Hungarian experiences ]

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[Introduction - Radiotherapy plays important role in the complex oncological treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The modern 3D radiotherapy treatments are based on cross-sectional CT and MR information, however more attention is being paid to functional hybrid imaging describing the biological and functional morphology of tumor lesions. 18F-DOPA is an amino acid tracer with high specificity and sensitivity, which may play an important role in the precise definition of target volume in the irradiation process of GBM patients. Our study presents the first experiences with 18F-DOPA based PET/CT/MR 3D irradiation planning process. Methods - In Hungary the 18F-DOPA radiotracer has been available for clinical use since September 2017. Between September 2017 and January 2018, at the Somogy County Kaposi Mór Teaching Hospital Dr. József Baka Diagnostic, Radiation Oncology, Research and Teaching Center 3 histologically verified glioblastoma multiforme patients received 18F-DOPA based 3D irradiation treatment. In the contouring process the native planning CT scanes were fused with the PET/MR series (T1 contrast enhanced, T2 and 18F-DOPA sequences). We defined 18F-DOPA uptake volume (BTV-F-DOPA), the T1 contrast enhanced MRI volume (GTV-T1CE), and the volume of the area covered by oedema on the T2 weighted MRI scan (CTV-oedema) in all patients. We also registered the BTV-F-DOPA volumes not covered by the conventional MR based target volumes. Results - Examining the 3 cases, the average volume of 18F-DOPA tumor was 22.7 cm3 (range 15.3-30.9; SD = 7.82). The average GTV T1 CE was found to be 8.7 cm3 (range 3.8-13.2; SD = 4.70). The mean CTV oedema volume was 40.3 cm3 (range 27.7-57.7; SD = 15.36). A non-overlapping target volume difference (BTV-F-DOPA not covered by CTV oedema area) was 4.5 cm3 (range 1-10.3; SD = 5.05) for PTV definition. Conclusion - Based on our results the tumor area defined by the amino acid tracer is not fully identical with the MRI defined T2 oedema CTV. 18F-DOPA defined BTV can modify the definiton of the PTV, and the radiotherapy treatment. ]

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