Hungarian Radiology

[Metal objects in the MR]

VÁRALLYAY György

APRIL 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(02)

[During magnetic resonance imaging the patient is exposed to three different types of electromagnetic radiation: static magnetic field, gradient or time varying magnetic fields and radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The potential risks associated with performing MRI in patients with ferromagnetic implants, materials, or devices are related to the possibility of movement or dislodgement, to the induction of electrical currents and to the heating. The majority of metallic implants are considered to be safe for MRI, but patients with cardiac pacemakers, ferromagnetic aneurysm clips, cochlear implants, implantable drug infusion pumps should not be examined by MRI.]

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