Hungarian Radiology

[Jugulotympanic glomus tumor - 7-year follow up of a rare disease]

SEBŐ Nóra, LÁZÁR István, SZÍGYÁRTÓ Mária, SÍPOS Gyula

OCTOBER 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(05-06)

[INTRODUCTION - The jugulotympanic glomus tumor is rare pathology with slow progression and its treatment is difficult. We present the imaging and clinical findings of a case obtained during 7 year follow up period. CASE REPORT - A 77-year-old female patient was admitted in 2000 with slowly progressing swelling of the neck. A palpable soft, non-painful resistance was noted at the main neck vessel region. Angiography revealed a jugulo-tympanic glomus tumor and embolization of the feeders from the external carotid artery was also performed. The size of the tumor is decreased but a clinically silent floating thrombus appeared in the internal jugular vein. It was treated with LMWH. Three years later external carotid artery transsection and denudation was performed. Slow progression of the tumor toward the subclavian vein was detected without intracranial invasion, in 2004. Repeated angiography was performed in 2005, but embolization was not possible due to technical reasons. Irradiation was considered to diminsh clinical symptoms, however due to the old age of the patients and the risk of bleeding, the treatment was not performed. Symptomatic therapy has been applied. CONCLUSION - Jugulo-tympanic glomus tumor is one of the non-chromaffin paragangliomas. The clinical symptomps are dominated by the paresis of IX.-X.-XI. nerves. Semimalignant disease and metastases are rare. The course is mostly influenced by compression syndromes and intracranial spread. The therapy is mostly microsurgical but preoperative embolization is frequently done to decrease blood loss. Surgical therapy is recommended with prior embolization of the feeders in order to decrease the blood supply of the mass. If surgery cannot be carried out irradiation therapy is needed. Unfortunately, all of these procedures are seldom curatives because of natural course of the disorder and the high frequency of recurrencies.]

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Hungarian Radiology

[MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy: First Hungarian experiences based on a canine study]

LAKOSI Ferenc, ANTAL Gergely, VANDULEK Csaba, KOTEK Gyula, KOVÁCS Árpád, GARAMVÖLGYI Rita, PETNEHÁZY Örs, HADJIEV Janaki, BAJZIK Gábor, BOGNER Péter, REPA Imre

[INTRODUCTION - Modern radical radiotherapy can be an effective alternative of radical prostatectomy in low risk patients with prostate tumor. Our objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of transperineal MR-guided prostate interventions in an open MR unit and to present our early clinical experiences on canines. METHODS AND MATERIALS - The procedures were performed on 5 canines in an open-configuration 0.35T MR scanner. For interventions an MR compatible custom-made device was used. The canines were placed in the right lateral decubitus position. Template reconstruction, trajectory planning, target and OAR delineation were based on T2 FSE images. For image guidance and target confirmation, fast spoiled gradient-echo (FSPGR) sequence was used. MR compatible coaxial needles were inserted through the perineum to the base of the prostate. After satisfactory position was confirmed, brachytherapy catheters were placed through the coaxial needles, which were then removed. RESULTS - Mean and standard deviation of the needle displacements was 2.2 mm±1.2 mm, with a median of 2 mm. 96% of the errors were less than 4.0 mm. Implantation induced prostate motion was measured with a mean of 10.3 and 2.3 mm in cranio-caudal and transverse directions. Significant movement was only observed during the first 4 needle insertions. The average time needed for each step was: anesthesia 15 minutes, setup and positioning 15 minutes, initial imaging 15 minutes, template registration and projection 15 minutes, contouring, trajectory planning, insertion of 10 needles 60 minutes. CONCLUSION - Based on our canine model experiences our method seems to be a promising approach for performing feasible, accurate, reliable and high-quality prostate MR guidance within a reasonable time span. We plan to introduce MR-guided biopsy and brachytherapy in human patients in the near future.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Computed tomography brain perfusion in the management of acute stroke]

BAGI Róbert, SZABÓ Tünde, MONOKI Erzsébet

[INTRODUCTION - The multidetector CT-technology made the application of perfusion CT-examination in the diagnosis of vascular brain damages possible in recently. The purpose of this study was to introduce the method and to assess the importance of computed tomography brain perfusion in emergency patient care and early diagnosis of brain ischemia. PATIENTS AND METHODS - We perform brain perfusion examinations with a 2 slice multidetector computer tomography (General Electric Highspeed NX/i, 2004) in our hospital. We examined the results of native and perfusion CT of 27 patients who underwent CT brain perfusion examination during emergency patient care in our department between 2004 January and 2006 December. We also examined if the patients got systemic thrombolysation and the patients’ condition after therapy. RESULTS - The perfusion software can make quantitative colour maps of parameters (CBF, CBV, MTT) and can visualize mean value and percentil decrease of measuring parameters. There were 18 positive and 8 negative CTbrain perfusion examinations in the examined period. One examination was technically unvaluable. CONCLUSION - By measuring blood flow's decrease the CT-brain perfusion examination can separate the reversible and irreversible damage of brain parenchyma. The examination protocol of brain vascular damages are native CT-scan, postcontrast perfusion CT-examination and CTangiography by the recommendation of international literature. Despite the multidetector CT-s and CT-perfusion technic is available for years, the CT-brain perfusion examination is not a routine process in the emergency patient care in our country.]

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[Initial experiences with TOF MR and contrastenhanced MR angiography of the supraaortic arteries]

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[INTRODUCTION - 95 MR angiographic examinations of the supraortic arteries were performed at the Rethy Pal Hospital, Bekescsaba between February 2003 and May 2005. The aim of this publication is to analyse the clinical benefit of contrast-enhanced MR angiography compared to duplex ultrasound and to evaluate the role of TOF MR angiography in the diagnostics of the carotid arteries. We compared the results of contrast-enhanced MR angiography, TOF MR angiography and duplex ultrasound. MATERIAL AND METHOD - 95 patients were examined by CE MR angiography following carotid duplex US in 59 cases and TOF MR angiography in 88 cases. Duplex US was done using LOGIQ 400 PRO system, MR angiography were performed by 1.5 T Siemens Magnetom Symphony unit. RESULTS - Stenosis of the internal carotid artery was confirmed in 67 cases and stenosis of the common carotid artery was seen in 10 cases. Bilateral ICA stenoses were detected in 17 patients and bilateral CCA stenoses could be revealed in 3 cases. The ICA stenosis was mild in 22 (33%), moderate in 18 (27%), and serious in 27 cases (40%). Occlusion was seen in 10 cases (15%). CE MR angiography showed stenosis at the origin of the CCA in 5 patients, at the origin of the vertebral and the subclavian artery in 10-10 cases that could not be detected by duplex ultrasound. Subclavian artery stenosis was seen in 15 patients, 7 of them presented subclavian steal syndrome. 13 patients had vertebral artery stenosis, 7 of them bilateral. 13 of the 20 VA stenoses were mild, 4 were found to be moderate and 3 were serious. In four patients the vertebral arteries were occluded. In six questionable cases MR angiography solved the problem. Reversed flow could be detected in 5 cases with duplex ultrasound suggestive of subclavian steal syndrome, which was later confirmed by TOF and CE MR angiography. TOF MR angiography showed stenosis on reconstructed images, which was not confirmed by neither duplex US or CE MR angiography. Paraganglioma was detected in one patient. CONCLUSION - In case of calcified plaques and abnormal arterial-course CE MR angiography contributes significantly to the detection of the stenosis. In cases with moderate and serious stenosis duplex ultrasound and MR angiography provided similar results. In case of occlusions the results of the two modalities were the same. The contrast-enhanced MR angiography gives the possibility to show the aortic origin of the supraaortic arteries in contrast to the duplex US and TOF MR angiography. To establish the diagnosis of subclavian steal syndrome the directional sensitivity of TOF MR angiography and duplex US is helpful adjunct to CE MR angiography.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Alexithymia is associated with cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson’s disease

SENGUL Yildizhan, KOCAK Müge, CORAKCI Zeynep, SENGUL Serdar Hakan, USTUN Ismet

Cognitive dysfunction (CD) is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Alexithy­mia is a still poorly understood neuropsychiatric feature of PD. Cognitive impairment (especially visuospatial dysfunction and executive dysfunction) and alexithymia share com­mon pathology of neuroanatomical structures. We hypo­thesized that there must be a correlation between CD and alexithymia levels considering this relationship of neuroanatomy. Objective – The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between alexithymia and neurocognitive function in patients with PD. Thirty-five patients with PD were included in this study. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale–20 (TAS-20), Geriatric Depression Inventory (GDI) and a detailed neuropsychological evaluation were performed. Higher TAS-20 scores were negatively correlated with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) similarities test score (r =-0.71, p value 0.02), clock drawing test (CDT) scores (r=-0.72, p=0.02) and verbal fluency (VF) (r=-0.77, p<0.01). Difficulty identifying feelings subscale score was negatively correlated with CDT scores (r=-0.74, p=0.02), VF scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04), visual memory immediate recall (r=-0.74, p=0.01). VF scores were also correlated with difficulty describing feelings (DDF) scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04). There was a reverse relationship bet­ween WAIS similarities and DDF scores (r=-0.70, p=0.02), and externally oriented-thinking (r=-0.77,p<0.01). Executive function Z score was correlated with the mean TAS-20 score (r=-62, p=0.03) and DDF subscale score (r=-0.70, p=0.01) Alexithymia was found to be associated with poorer performance on visuospatial and executive function test results. We also found that alexithymia was significantly correlated with depressive symptoms. Presence of alexithymia should therefore warn the clinicians for co-existing CD.

Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

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[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]