Hungarian Radiology

[Gábor Winkler: Discovery of the world of the opera]

MESTER Ádám

MARCH 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(01-02)

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Further articles in this publication

Hungarian Radiology

[The radiohygienic aspects of the interventional radiology]

PELLET Sándor, GICZI Ferenc, GÁSPÁRDY Géza, TEMESI Alfréda

[Interventional radiology is a relatively new and very rapidly developing cost-effective branch of radiology. Its aim to help or to replace surgical procedures and interventions in many cases are life saving, which are performed by imaging modality control (most commonly angiography or fluoroscopy). During interventional radiological procedures the exposure of staff and patients is usually higher, than in conventional radiography or fluoroscopy. Deterministic effects may also occur. The dosimetry can be carried out by film dosimetry, thermoluminescent dosimetry, DAP meters, semiconductor detectors and personal electronic dosimeter. The basis of reduction of radiation exposure is the radiation protection training. An important rule is that reduction of patient exposure is connected with reduction of staff exposure. With the use of appropriate tools and training the most injuries are avoidable.]

Hungarian Radiology

[dr. Erzsébet Schläffer]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Transcranial Doppler monitoring of distal embolism during of carotid stenting]

SZIKRA Péter, VÖRÖS Erika, SZTRIHA László, SZÓLICS Alex

[INTRODUCTION - Reducing the risk of embolisation during endovascular treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis is very important. The rate of embolisation is affected by the different steps of stenting manipulation. Using transcranial Doppler equipment we studied the embolic signals during the different phases of carotid dilatation and stenting. MATERIAL AND METHOD - 50 patients (33 male, 17 female; mean age 64 years) were intraproceduraly monitorized with transcranial Doppler. Predilatation was necessary in nine cases, postdilatation was performed in 39 cases. The number of emboli were measured in seven different steps of endovascular treatment of carotid stenosis. Different type of commercial available endovascular devices were used. RESULTS - Intraprocedural embolisation was observed in every case. In different phases of carotid stenting the rate of embolisation showed marked differences in each phase of carotid stenting. Crossing the stenosis with stent delivery system were accompanied by a low rate of embolism (5.3) compared to the level during stent opening (9.16) and balloon dilatation (9.96). The highest level of embolisation was observed during predilatation (15.9) without the protection of the stent. CONCLUSIONS - We detected embolisation in all of the cases, however the number of embolic signals varied in different phases of carotid artery stenting. Embolisation can be reduced if the most dangerous steps (i.e. pre- and postdilatation) are avoided. Using TCD monitorisation the physician can be informed by the degree of embolisation that may alarm the interventionalist to perform the procedure more carefully, furthermore it can be employed during the training of carotid stenting.]

Hungarian Radiology

[2nd National Meeting of the Radiology Residents]

NAGY Endre, PALKÓ András, LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[The emperor’s new cloth]

LOMBAY Béla

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Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

EEG-based connectivity in patients with partial seizures with and without generalization

DÖMÖTÖR Johanna, CLEMENS Béla, EMRI Miklós, PUSKÁS Szilvia, FEKETE István

Objective - to investigate the neurophysiological basis of secondary generalization of partial epileptic seizures. Patients and methods - inter-ictal, resting-state EEG functional connectivity (EEGfC) was evaluated and compared: patients with exclusively simple partial seizures (sp group) were compared to patients with simple partial and secondary generalized seizures (spsg group); patients with exclusively complex partial seizures (cp group) were compared to patients with cp and secondary generalized seizures (cpsg group); the collapsed sp+cp group (spcp) was compared to those who had exclusively secondary generalized seizures (sg group). EEGfC was computed from 21-channel waking EEG. 3 minutes of waking EEG background activity was analyzed by the LORETA Source Correlation (LSC) software. Current source density time series were computed for 23 pre-defined cortical regions (ROI) in each hemisphere, for the 1-25 Hz very narrow bands (1 Hz bandwidth). Thereafter Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between all pairs of ROI time series in the same hemisphere. Z-scored correlation coefficients were compared at the group level (t-tests and correction for multiple comparisons by local false discovery rate, FDR). Results - Statistically significant (corrected p<0.05) EEGfC differences emerged at specific frequencies (spsg > sg; cpsg > cp), and at many frequencies (sg > spcp). The findings indicated increased coupling between motor cortices and several non-motor areas in patients with partial and sg seizures as compared to patients with partial seizures and no sg seizures. Further findings suggested increased coupling between medial parietal-occipital areas (structural core of the cortex) and lateral hemispheric areas. Conclusion - increased inter-ictal EEGfC is associated with habitual occurrence of secondary generalized seizures.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[“I am no Poet, You are Gabi the Poet” – Gábor Karinthy ]

FALVAY Dóra

Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE IMPORTANCE OF THE RECOGNITION AND TREATMENT OF LIPID METABOLISM DISORDERS IN THE SECONDARY PREVENTION OF CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES]

FOLYOVICH András, HORVÁTH Eszter

[The high world prevalence of cerebrovascular diseases, and the particularly bad morbidity rates of Hungary are well known. The physiological properties of the brain make stroke prevention outstandingly important. Effective prevention will be reflected in the reduction of the late complications that are otherwise common and expensive to treat. Because of the common simultaneous development of stroke, cardiovascular and peripheral vascular diseases, overall vascular disease prevention is preferred, even if the various vascular diseases manifest in different degrees in a patient. Hungarian data also indicate the high risk of recurrence of cerebrovascular diseases, therefore, the importance of secondary prevention is obvious. Large international studies have proven the strokepreventing effect, and, by a pleiotropic drug action, additional benefits, of the efficient treatment of blood lipid disorders. Consensus conferences in recent years defined clear and even stricter lipid-lowering target values, mostly to be reached by “double inhibition”, bile acid binding resins, fibrates and nicotinic acid derivatives, beside the most common statin treatment. Neurological and stroke departments and clinics play a pivotal role in vascular prevention.]