Hungarian Radiology

[Chondrodysplasia punctata - retrospective diagnosis]

K. Kozlowski, P. Beighton, J. Godlonton

JUNE 20, 2002

Hungarian Radiology - 2002;76(03)

[A 10 year-old, mentally normal boy with flat face, skin abnormalities, contracture of Achilles and knee tendons, strabismus and unique bony abnormalities is reported. The characteristics of skin changes and pattern of bony abnormalities allowed the retrospective diagnosis of atypical form of chondrodysplasia punctata.]

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[Ogilvie’s syndrome associated with excretory urography]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső, SZŰCS Gabriella

[INTRODUCTION - The Ogilvie's syndrome is a disturbance of colonic innervation with parasympathic overreaction was assumed to be cause of large bowel segment spasm and poststenotic accumulation of gas. There is no distention in small intestine. CASE REPORT - In case of a 15 years old male during excretory urography six minutes after the administration of contrast material infusion Ogilvie's syndrome had occured. On 6, 12 and 18 min. abdominal plain film were demonstrated the acute spasm and poststenotic large bowel distention by air lumenogram phenomenon in the kidneys ambilateral renal tuberculosis by the whitening-like contrast opacity arising from centre calyx (pyelotubular reflux) in right side and by clubbing of calyces in left side (daisy flower sign). Not involved the small intestine. The colonic spasm and accumulation of gas lasted approximately 6 hours and ceased without medical aid. CONCLUSION - The Ogilvie's syndrome accompanying excretory urography is a toxic effect attributing to transient injury of peripheric neures and neurovisceral synapses.]

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