Hungarian Immunology

[Intracytoplasmic cytokines in dermatomyositis]

ALEKSZA Magdolna, SZEGEDI Andrea, ANTAL-SZALMÁS Péter, SIPKA Sándor, DANKÓ Katalin

JANUARY 10, 2004

Hungarian Immunology - 2004;3(01)

[OBJECTIVE - To investigate the intracellular and soluble cytokine levels in peripheral blood of patients with active and inactive dermatomyositis (DM). Methods The frequency of the intracellular IFN-g, IL- 4 and IL-10 expression of CD4+ or CD8+ cells were determined by flow cytometry. We measured the concentrations of soluble cytokines with commercial ELISAs. RESULTS - In active DM we observed decreased IFNg expression of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. These prominent changes disappeared in the inactive stage of the disease. In DM we could not detect a significant change in the intracellular IL-4 cytokine expression either in the active or in the inactive form. The IL-10 expression was elevated in the inactive state of the patients. CONCLUSION - We can state that a difference between aDM and iDM seems to exist in the level of peripheral blood lymphocytes and their intracellular cytokine content.]

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