Hungarian Immunology

[Cyclosporin A therapy of autoimmune urticaria]

IRINYI Beatrix, ZEHER Margit, HUNYADI János, SZEGEDI Andrea

JANUARY 10, 2004

Hungarian Immunology - 2004;3(01)

[INTRODUCTION - In chronic idiopathic urticaria the etiology is unknown in spite of extensive investigations. In 27-50% of these cases autoimmune mechanisms are detected in the background. CASE REPORT - The authors demonstrate the case of an autoimmune urticaria patient with positive autologous serum skintest, who responded well to cyclosporin A therapy. CONCLUSION - According to the observation and the relevant literature, the authors also found small dose cyclosporin A therapy useful and safe in treating therapy resistant chronic urticaria.]

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