Hungarian Immunology

[CONFERENCE CALENDAR]

FEBRUARY 20, 2005

Hungarian Immunology - 2005;4(01)

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Hungarian Immunology

[Immunology delectat]

SZEGEDI Gyula

Hungarian Immunology

[Pathomechanism of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis]

GÁL István, CSIKI Zoltán, SZEGEDI László, G. KISS Gyula

[The two archetypes of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) have a considerably high prevalence and chronic morbidity, and thereby a striking public health relevance amongst the maladies involving the gastrointestinal tract. Unveiling their pathogenesis can be the key for the development of successful therapeutic approaches. Our view of these diseases has undergone radical changes in the past few years, and the latest discoveries have shed new light upon their pathomechanism. A multifactorial view is appropriate when explaining their pathogenesis, although certain factors are seemingly of particular importance.]

Hungarian Immunology

[Experimental arthritis model]

SZÁNTÓ Sándor, GONDA Andrea, MIKECZ Katalin, GLANT Tibor, SZEKANECZ Zoltán

[Animal models of experimental arthritis can be used to understand pathophysiology of the arthritic processes in patients and provide opportunity to develop new therapeutic approaches. The animal models can be divided into different categories based on the pathomechanism of the model and on the features that resemble human inflammatory joint diseases. This review provides an overview of the most widely used types of experimental arthritis models emphasizing their advantages and limitations in the basic arthritis research.]

Hungarian Immunology

[Immune-dysfunctions in patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma being in a long lasting complete remission]

ALEKSZA Magdolna, KERESZTES Katalin, BARÁTH Sándor, SIPKA Sándor, ILLÉS Árpád

[OBJECTIVES - Immunosuppression has long been known to be associated with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The authors report on immunologic abnormalities with special focus on cellular immunity in patients with Hodgkin’s disease in complete remission. METHODS - We determined the proportion of the lymphocytes subpopulations, activated T cells, CD4+/CD25+ suppressor T cell population and intracytoplasmic cytokines by flow cytometry. The soluble cytokines were measured by classical ELISA technique. RESULTS - Based on lymphocyte cell surface antigen expression the subpopulations were as described in the literature, however a unique elevation of CD4+/CD25+ cell fraction was detected. The decreased amount of IFN-γ in the serum suggest Th2 dominance, but reduced intracellular IL-4 production in both CD4+ and CD8+ cells results from Th1 dominance. These results somewhat contrary but can not be completely compared as in vivo and in vitro techniques used for the analysis are not identical. However a constant elevation concentration and expression of IL-10 and TGF-β is observed. CONCLUSION - These alterations may reflect the existence of an immunosuppressive state also in the peripheral blood of Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients not only in the lymph nodes.]

Hungarian Immunology

[Functional measurements of the hand’s circulation in Raynaud’s patients]

CSIKI Zoltán, GALUSKA László, GARAI Ildikó, SZABÓ Nóra, GALAJDA Zoltán, VARGA József, ZEHER Margit

[INTRODUCTION - In patients presenting with isolated tissue perfusion disturbance without large vessel involvement the examination of hand microcirculation is of major importance. In our study we present the results of three examination methods used for hand perfusion monitoring which measure the tissue microcirculation in different depths. PATIENTS AND METHODS - We examined 58 primary Raynaud's patients using capillary microscopy, laser doppler perfusion imaging and hand perfusion scintigraphy with Tc-99m-DTPA. From our patients 38 were smokers, 42 patients frequently suffered from headache. For the validation of our laser Doppler results we involved into the study also 16 non-smoker healthy volunteers. For the standardisation of the results the studies were performed in a climatised room. During the laser examination we performed and analysed also the post-occlusion hyperaemia test. RESULTS - In the majority of our patients no morphological alterations were found with capillary microscopy. In primary Raynaud’s patients the perfusion values measured with laser-Doppler scanner in basic condition were significantly lower both in fingers’ and palm’s regions compared to healthy controls. In the primary Raynaud’s group the smokers had significantly lower hyperaemic response than the non-smokers and we measured also significantly lower FPR (finger-to-palm ratio) values with hand perfusion scintigraphy. Both with laser doppler imaging and hand perfusion scintigraphy there was no difference between the values measured in patients with or without headache. CONCLUSIONS - We consider of benefit the functional examination of hand circulation in all diseases involving the hand microcirculation.]

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[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]