Clinical Neuroscience

[INTRACEREBRAL STEAL AFTER ACETAZOLAMID ADMINISTRATION]

VASTAGH Ildikó, POZSÁR Melinda, FOLYOVICH András, DEBRECZENI Róbert, PÁLVÖLGYI László, BERECZKI Dániel, SZIRMAI Imre

MAY 30, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(05-06)

[Occlusion or high grade stenosis of the internal carotid artery may be asymptomatic depending on the collateral patterns in the circle of Willis and the reserve capacity of the microvascular (arteriolar) system. The distensibility of the cerebral arterioles may be described quantitatively by the vasomotor reactivity. We present three patients with severe stenosis of an internal carotid artery associated with more severe stenosis or occlusion of the contralateral internal carotid artery. We continuously measured blood flow velocity in both middle cerebral arteries by transcranial Doppler ultrasound in rest and for 20 minutes after IV administration of 1 g acetazolamide. Arterial blood pressure was determined with tonometry, end-tidal CO2 was determined by a capnometer. In resting condition the anterior communicating artery, the posterior communicating artery and the ophthalmic artery supplied collateral blood flow towards the side of the more severe internal carotid artery disease. Blood flow velocity decreased after acetazolamide administration in all patients in the middle cerebral arteries on the side of the more severe occlusive carotid disease, while increased on the contralateral side. We assume that the exhausted arteriolar system on the more severely affected side was not able to further dilate and the open collateral system could have driven blood towards the other side with preserved reserve capacity. The reduced blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries after acetazolamide may reflect this intracerebral steal phenomenon.]

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[Background - Sudden death appears in 8-17% of epilepsy patients non-responding to antiepileptic therapy. Some studies suggest that the most common cause of death is seizure-related cardiac arrhythmia. Aim of study - To analyze the alteration of the heart rate six hours before and after the seizures. Methods - Eighteen patients suffering from focal epilepsy were examined before epilepsy surgery. Video-EEG-ECG was carried out for 2-10 days, and 32 seizures were registered. Analysis of the heart rate was based on the 5- minute-long epochs of the ECGs taken at the 5-10-15- 30th minutes and at the 1-3-6th hours before and after seizures. Results - The heart rate increases (from average 69 beats/min to 92 beats/min, p<0.001) immediately after seizures, tough significantly higher heart rate was observed 3 hours after seizures. There were no patients with severe periictal bradycardia. In one of our patients, ectopic cardiac rhythm occurred after a generalized tonicclonic seizure. Conclusions - We can conclude that the sympathic activity increases while the parasympathic activity decreases after seizures. The observed alterations lasted for a long time and predict to fatal arrhythmias. These suggest that sudden death in epilepsy can be induced by cardiac arrhythmias connected with epileptic seizures.]

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