Clinical Neuroscience

[Hungarian experiences with levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel in the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease]

NAGY Helga, TAKÁTS Annamária, TÓTH Adrián, BERECZKI Dániel, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, DIBÓ György, VÉCSEI László, KOVÁCS Norbert, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsa, KOMOLY Sámuel, VARANNAI Lajos, ZEMLÉNYI Gyöngyi

NOVEMBER 28, 2014

Clinical Neuroscience - 2014;67(11-12)

[In the advanced Parkison’s disease (PD) the late complications of levodopa therapy have to be considered: motor and/or non-motor fluctuations with or without disturbing dyskinesias. The non-motor fluctuations often influence the quality of life (QoL) in a much more negative way compared with the motor symptoms. In the treatment of advanced PD there are several device-aided methods - deep brain stimulation, apomorphine pump, levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG ) - to improve the symptoms, the QoL, sometimes even in an individual, tailored custom form. The LCIG therapy was introduced in Hungary in 2011. Here we summarize the data of our patients: we have tested almost 60 patients and in 43 cases we have started this treatment. We analyze the duration of illness, levodopa therapy, motor and non-motor fluctuation of patients and present our experiences with the test phase and the chronic LCIG therapy via PEG/PEJ implantation. We paid attention to the surgery and device - depending side effects. Our experiences are similar to the international data. In patients selection „the right treatment, to the right patient, in the right time” is of importance.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[A rare paroxysmal movement disorder: Mixed type of paroxysmal dyskinesia]

AYSU Sen, DILEK Atakli, BAHAR Guresci, BAKI Arpaci

[Paroxysmal dyskinesias are rare, heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by recurrent attacks of involuntary movements. The four classic categories of paroxysmal dyskinesias are kinesigenic, nonkinesigenic, exercise-induced and hypnogenic. There are some patients that do not fit in these four groups of paroxysmal dyskinesia and are termed as “mixed type”. We describe a 13-year-old girl who had features of both paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia and paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia that was misdiagnosed as refractory epilepsy. She improved substantially with a combination of carbamazepine and clonazepame. It is important to recognize the clinical presentation of paroxysmal dyskinesias and distinguish these movement disorders from other disorders, such as psychogenic disorders and epilepsia, for deciding the treatment and prognosis of the patients. This case highlights the importance of the recognition of a rare paroxysmal movement disorders.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Critical illness associated neuromuscular disorders - Keep them in mind]

NEMES Réka, MOLNÁR Levente, FÜLEP Zoltán, FEKETE Klára, BERHÉS Mariann, FÜLESDI Béla

[Neuromuscular disorders complicating sepsis and critical illness are not new and scarce phenomena yet they receive little attention in daily clinical practice. Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy affect nearly half of the patients with sepsis. The difficult weaning from the ventilator, the prolonged intensive care unit and hospital stay, the larger complication and mortality rate these disorders predispose to, put a large burden on the patient and the health care system. The aim of this review is to give an insight into the pathophysiological background, diagnostic possibilities and potential preventive and therapeutic measures in connection with these disorders to draw attention to their significance and underline the importance of preventive approach.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Meeting of the management of Hungarian Epilepsy League]

SZUPERA Zoltán

Clinical Neuroscience

[Tailored cranioplasty using CAD-CAM technology]

VITANOVICS Dusan, MAJOR Ottó, LOVAS László, BANCZEROWSKI Péter

[Objective - The majority of cranial defects are results of surgical intervention. The defect must be covered within resonable period of time usually after 4-6 week given the fact that the replacement of bone improve the brain circulation. Number of surgical techniques and materials are available to perform cranioplasty. Due to favorable properties we chosed ultra high molecular weight polyethylene as material. In this paper the authors show a procedure which allows tailored artificial bone replacement using state of art medical and engineering techniques. Methods - between 2004 and 2012, 19 patients were operated on cranial bone defect and a total of 22 3D custom- designed implants were implanted. The average age of patients was 35.4 years. In 12 patients we performed primary cranioplasty, while seven patients had the replacement at least once. Later the implants had to be removed due to infection or other causes (bone necrosis, fracture). All patients had native and bone- windowed 1 mm resolution CT. The 3D design was made using the original CT images and with design program. Computer controlled lathe was used to prepare a precise-fitting model. During surgery, the defect was exposed and the implant was fixed to normal bone using mini titanium plates and screws. All of our patients had control CT at 3, 6 and12 months after surgery and at the same time neurological examination. Results - Twenty-one polyethylene and one titanium implants were inserted. The average follow-up of the patients was 21.5 months, ranged from two to 96 months. We follow 12 patients (63.15%) more than one year. No intraoperative implant modifications had to be made. Each of the 22 implant exactly matched the bone defect proved by CT scan. No one of our patients reported aesthetic problems and we did not notice any kind of aesthetic complication. We had short term complication in three cases due to cranioplasty, subdural, epidural haemorrhage and skin defect. Conclusion - Polyethylene is in all respects suitable for primary and secondary cranioplasty. Combined with 3D CADCAM method excellent aesthetic and functional result was achieved. In our study no case of infection occured. Proper preoperative preparation is important.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurocognitive impairments of HIV infected individuals - Preliminary results of a national prevalence study in Hungary]

LAKATOS Botond, SZABÓ Zsuzsa, BOZZAI Barbara, BÁNHEGYI Dénes, GAZDAG Gábor

[Background and purpose - The outcome of HIV infection has dramatically improved due to the widespread use of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Opportunistic infections faded and internal and hemato-oncological diseases along with neurological conditions came to the forth. Present study is to evaluate neurocognitive performance of the Hungarian HIV infected individuals, at first in this setting. Patients and methods - We performed this cross-sectional pilot study within the frames of a national, single-center; prospective study on group of HIV infected patients, analyzing medical data and neurocognitive performance. Based on international recommendations visual memory, visuomotor coordination, non-verbal learning ability, executive functions and reaction time were tested by six domains of a computerized neuropsychological test battery (Vienna Test System). Results - Data of 59 enrolled HIV individuals were analysed; nine of whom were women (15%), median age 42.6 (IQR: 32.4-48.1) years. In 32.2% (n=19) of patients neurocognitive impairment was detected. Duration of infection and cART treatment time tended to be longer in impaired group (not significant). Lower CD4 cell count at the time of examination (p=0.047), psychiatric diseases other than depression (p=0.005) were found significantly associated with impairment; tertiary education qualification were more common (p=0.033) among non-affected patients. By correlation analysis age, infected time and duration of cART were significantly associated with motor deficit. Conclusion - HAND was detected in almost one third part of examined patients, which largely corresponds that in developed countries were observed. Duration of infection and of cART therapy associated motor deficit was found to be the most common impairment. This finding might be interpreted by direct effect of HIV, neurotoxicity of antiretrovirals and also by accelerated ageing of this population.]

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[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Hypertension and nephrology

[About the care of patients with hyperuricaemia and gout]

[This consensus document is intended to provide guidance for the effective and efficient treatment of asymptomatic individuals with high uric acid levels and gout patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A single center experience and systemic analysis of cases in Turkey

USLU Ilgen Ferda, ELIF Gökçal, GÜRSOY Esra Azize, KOLUKISA Mehmet, YILDIZ Babacan Gulsen

We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.