Clinical Neuroscience

[Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy in childhood]

GYÖRGY Ilona, BÍRÓ Anna, MECHLER Ferenc, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

DECEMBER 20, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(11-12)

[HNPP is an autosomal-dominant inherited disease clinically characterized by painless, episodic, recurrent peripheral palsy often preceded by minor trauma or toxic damage. It generally develops during adolescence and rarely is reported in childhood. We observed two children with this disease. In one of the cases, also the child’s mother is suffering from HNPP. Clinical and genetic characterics of our three patients are summarized in this article.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Pediatric intraventricular tumors]

MARKIA Balázs, GYORSOK Zsuzsanna, KORDÁS Mariann, BOGNÁR László

[Pediatric intraventricular tumors present a well circumscribed group from surgical point of view. These tumors growing in the ventricular system cause hydrocephalus in most of the cases, the presenting symptoms are the signs of raised intracranial pressure. The mass lesion may remain silent for a long period, especially in infancy due to compensatory mechanisms, and the tumor might reach extreme size making the surgery a real challenge. This group has very specific postoperative problems resulting from the disturbance of CSF circulation. In this study we present the retrospective analysis of 55 patient operated for intraventricular tumor in the National Institute of Neurosurgery between 1991 and 2006. Data were analysed regarding histological type, presenting symptoms, type of surgical approach, radicalitiy of the resection and postoperative complications. In addition to our own results brief presentation of the specific histological groups is given based on the available literature.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Changes of the immune functions in patients with eating disorders]

PÁLI Anikó Andrea, PÁSZTHY Bea

[Aims - In this study we investigated whether calorie restriction or redundant food intake influences the function of regulatory T cells (Tregs), and their main regulators (dendritic cells and macrophages), or the targets of Tregs, CD4+ lymphocytes. Patients and methods - We investigated 11 white adolescents (10 girls and 1 boy) with anorexia nervosa, 12 obes adolescents and 10 healthy controlls. With flow cytometry we determined the prevalence of Tregs, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. We applied intracellular staining to investigate TNF-alpha and IL-12 production of macrophages, moreover IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-gamma production of CD4+ cells. We also determined calcium flux kinetics upon activation in CD4+ cells. Results - We did not find any difference between obese, anorectic and control individuals in the prevalence of Tregs, dendritic cells, TNF-alpha and IL-12 positive macrophages, IL-4 and IFN-gamma positive CD4+ lymphocytes. We found that the prevalence of IL-2 positive lymphocytes after activation was lower in anorectic than in control subjects [median (range): 11.50 (7.60-15.30) vs. 13.50 (12.00-22.00), p=0.023], and in obese patients, too [12.50 (8.50-15.50) vs. 13.50 (12.00-22.00), p=0.028]. IFN-gamma/IL-4 ratio in CD4+ cells was higher in obese patients compared with control (p=0.046). The calcium flux characteristics of lymphocytes upon activation differed markedly in anorectic and healthy subjects as maximal calcium levels developed later in anorectic patients [86 (45- 232) vs. 215 (59-235) second, p<0.05]. We also tested the association between lymphocyte activation parameters and patients' clinical status, but did not find any association between the variables. Discussion - Our results suggest that the antigen presenting cell - regulatory T cell - CD4+ lymphocyte axis might be affected by calorie and nutritional disturbances, further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying processes.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Pneumococcal meningitis in children - 9 1/2-year-experience at Szent László hospital, Budapest, Hungary ]

IVÁDY Balázs, LIPTAI Zoltán, ÚJHELYI Enikő, BALÁZS György

[Background and objective - No recent publications are available about pneumococcal meningitis in Hungarian children. The aim of this study was to collect data of epidemiological, clinical and prognostic features of pneumococcal meningitis in children treated at Szent László Hospital, Budapest, Hungary. Methods - We conducted a retrospective review of medical charts and follow-up records of patients aged 1 to 18 years admitted to our Pediatric and Pediatric Intensive Care Units due to pneumococcal meningitis between 1st Jan 1998 and 30th Jun 2007. Results - 31 children with 34 cases of pneumococcal meningitis were admitted to our hospital in the study period. Two children developed recurrent illness. The mean age was 6 years, 26% were under 1 year of age. The mean duration of hospital stay was 21 days, 97% required intensive care. Frequent clinical symptoms were fever (100%), nuchal rigidity and vomiting (78%), altered mental status (71%), Kernig's and Brudzinski's signs (58%) and seizures (41%). Otitis media, sinusitis, mastoiditis were present in 44%, 58%, 41%, respectively. Subdural effusion, parenchymal cerebral lesion and sinus thrombosis were documented in 5, 3 and 2 cases, respectively. One third of the patients recieved ceftriaxon, two thirds were administered ceftriaxon and vancomycin. Adjunctive therapy with dexamethason was given to 91% of the children. 70% of patients required mechanical ventillation. 9 patients (25%) required endoscopic sinus surgery. In 13 cases (38%) mastoidectomy, in 5 children (15%) neurosurgery was performed. The case fatality rate was 23.5%. 8 (23.5%) patients had mild or moderate, 1 child (3%) developed severe neurological sequelae. Conclusion - Pneumococcal meningitis in children remains a source of substantial morbidity and mortality in childhood. The long hospital stay, the frequent need for intensive care and severe neurologic sequelae emphasize the importance of early diagnosis, early treatment and prevention with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Devastating epileptic encephalopathypseudoencephalitis: the new type of catastrophe epilepsy in our department]

NEUWIRTH Magdolna, PARAICZ Éva, LIPTAI Zoltán

[Purpose - Analysis of history of our five patients with intractable epilepsy whose illnes have begun with prolonged status epilepticus (SE) and high-grad fever of unknow cause. Methods - Retrospective study analysis of selected five intractable epileptic patients at a median age of 11.5 (8-14) years. Results - All children had normal development before epilepsy begun. Intractable SE lasted 3-10 (median seven) days by four patients and three months by one patient. The cause of illness was unknow at the beginning and the MRI were normal. Intractable epilepsy followed the SE in all cases without any latent period. Follow-up of the children was 3-15 (median 9.5) years. The seizures came continually with few-day-long breaks, antiepileptic drugs were ineffective. Semiology of seizures, EEG, and functional imaging examinations (PET, SPECT) referred to temporal and frontal lobe damages. Later on, the MR images showed hippocampal sclerosis in one patient and mild generalized brain atrophy in the others. During the years, cognitive deterioration and behavioral problems have been realized. The most severe patient developed tetraparesis, fell in vigil coma and died after five years. Conclusions - The symptoms of our patients fulfilled the criteria of devastating epileptic encephalopathy in schoolaged children.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[How do temporal lobe seizures changeby age?]

FOGARASI András

[Seizure semiology describes different - motor, sensory, autonomic, etc. - aspects of epileptic seizures. Several semiological studies showed already that different epilepsies - especially temporal lobe epilepsy - contain age-dependent features. In our researches, we tried to assess these subjective aspects with as objective methods as possible. We gave a comprehensive (preictal, ictal, and postictal) description of seizure semiology in patients fulfilling the gold standard criteria of semiological studies: being seizure free after temporal lobe resections. Our studies based on a large population, assess epileptic features at different levels of brain maturation. They help to understand why certain semiological axes show special characteristics at different ages. In this review, I summarize the most important results of our seizure semiology studies in temporal lobe epilepsy.]

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[Association between cyclothymic affective temperament and hypertension]

NEMCSIK János, BATTA Dóra, KŐRÖSI Beáta, RIHMER Zoltán

[Affective temperaments (cyclothymic, hypertymic, depressive, anxious, irritable) are stable parts of personality and after adolescent only their minor changes are detectable. Their connections with psychopathology is well-described; depressive temperament plays role in major depression, cyclothymic temperament in bipolar II disorder, while hyperthymic temperament in bipolar I disorder. Moreover, scientific data of the last decade suggest, that affective temperaments are also associated with somatic diseases. Cyclothymic temperament is supposed to have the closest connection with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension is higher parallel with the presence of dominant cyclothymic affective temperament and in this condition the frequency of cardiovascular complications in hypertensive patients was also described to be higher. In chronic hypertensive patients cyclothymic temperament score is positively associated with systolic blood pressure and in women with the earlier development of hypertension. The background of these associations is probably based on the more prevalent presence of common risk factors (smoking, obesity, alcoholism) with more pronounced cyclothymic temperament. The scientific importance of the research of the associations of personality traits including affective temperaments with somatic disorders can help in the identification of higher risk patient subgroups.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Risk of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Focus on aceclofenac]

FARSANG Csaba

[Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most frequently used pharmaceuticals. Nevertheless, a number of studies emphasized that NSAIDs were damaging not only the gastrointestinal (GI), but also the cardiovascular (CV) system, could increase the blood pressure, the frequency of coronary events (angina, myocardial infarction) and stroke incidence, as well as they might deterio­rate renal functions. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) did not find evidence that administering NSAIDs could increase the risk of developing COVID-19 or worsened the condition of COVID-19 patients. However, unwanted effects of specific drugs differ substantially in their occurrence and seriousness as well. It seemed to be for a long time that the NSAIDs provoked higher GI-risk was closely related to the COX1/COX2 selectivity, like the cardiovascular (CV) risk to the COX2/COX1 selectivity, however, the recent data did not prove it clearly. Based on the available literature while pondering the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular adverse events, among all NSAIDs the aceclofenac profile seemed to be the most favourable.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A single center experience and systemic analysis of cases in Turkey

USLU Ilgen Ferda, ELIF Gökçal, GÜRSOY Esra Azize, KOLUKISA Mehmet, YILDIZ Babacan Gulsen

We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.

Clinical Neuroscience

Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral haemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

Clinical Neuroscience

Extraskeletal, intradural, non-metastatic Ewing’s sarcoma. Case report

OTTÓFFY Gábor, KOMÁROMY Hedvig

Intracranial localization of Ewing’s sarcoma is considerably very rare. Herein, we present clinical and neuroimaging findings regarding a 4-year-old boy with intracranial Ewing’s sarcoma. He was born prematurely, suffered intraventricular haemorrhage, posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus developed, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted in the newborn period. The patient endured re­gular follow ups, no signs of shunt malfunction nor increased intracranial pressure were observed. The last neuroima­ging examination was performed at 8 months of age. Upon reaching the age of 4 years, repeated vomiting and focal seizures began, and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure were detected. A brain MRI depicted a left frontoparietal space-occupying lesion infiltrating the superior sagittal sinus. The patient underwent a craniotomy resulting in the total excision of the tumour. The histological examination of the tissue revealed a small round blue cell tumour. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of EWSR1 gene translocation with FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization). No additional metastases were detected during the staging examinations. The patient was treated in accordance to the EuroEwing 99 protocol. Today, ten years onward, the patient is tumour and seizure free and has a reasonably high quality of life.