Clinical Neuroscience

[Factors affecting the development of chronic hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage]

FÜLÖP Béla1, DEÁK Gábor1, MENCSER Zoltán1, KUNCZ Ádám1, BARZÓ Pál1

JULY 22, 2009

Clinical Neuroscience - 2009;62(07-08)

[Hydrocephalus is a common complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Numerous studies have dealt so far with the triggering cause of the chronic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorptional and circulatory disorders. Despite the fact that these studies gave several different explanations, most of them agreed on the fact that the obstruction of CSF pathway has a crucial role in the development of the clinical feature. By examing three years’ clinical cases they the authors were trying to find out which are the factors that influence the development of the late hydrocephalus which succeeds the subarachnoid hemorrhage; moreover to find out if the incidence of the latter may be decreased by a continuous drainage of CSF which advances its purification. One hundred and seventy-one patients (one hundred and twenty-seven females) were treated by aneurysmal SAH at Department of Neurosurgery, University of Szeged between 2002 and 2005. The following parameters were recorded: gender, clinical state, risk factors (smoking, consuming alcohol and hypertension), the method and the time of surgical treatment as well as CSF drainage. The studies have shown that the risk of incidence of chronic hydrocephalus’s incidence were higher in men and in case of severe clinical state with severe SAH. The disturbed CSF circulation and/or absorption were positively correlated with consuming alcohol and hypertension, while smoking did not affect it. The rate of the incidence of chronic hydrocephalus among our patients was lower (5.8%) compared to the results of other studies (7-40%) suggests that disturbance of CSF circulation and/or absorption may be avoided in the majority of cases by continuous external ventricular or lumbar CSF drainage, which is applied routinly.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Idegsebészeti Klinika, Szeged

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