Clinical Neuroscience

[Amino acid distribution in cerebrospinal fluid (I.) Arginine]

SZILÁGYI Á. Katalin1, PATAKY István1

JANUARY 01, 1966

Clinical Neuroscience - 1966;19(01)

[Colorimetric arginine determinations were performed in CSF cerebrospinalis and serum, which were found normal by routine laboratory methods. It was concluded that the conflicting values in the world literature could be explained by the site of CSF collection and the amount of CSF taken, because the arginine content of cysternal CSF is higher than that of lumbar CSF. A correlation has been found between the arginine level in lumbar CSF and the serum level found in the same individual. There also appears to be a numerical correlation between CSF arginine levels and age (decreasing progressively with advancing age), but this correlation is not statistically proven. ]

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