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Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

Marchiafava-Bignami disease: Report of three cases

GUNAY Gul, MESUDE Özerden, ZEYNEP Ozdemir, CAHIT Keskinkiliç, HAKAN Selçuk, BATUHAN Kara, AYSUN Soysal

Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a rare alcohol-associated disorder characterized by demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. We report three patients who had history of chronic alcoholism, different clinical presentation and MRI findings consistent with the diagnosis of Marchiafava-Bignami disease.

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2017

A case with reversible neurotoxicity induced by metronidazole

EREN Fulya, ALDAN Ali Mehmet, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GUL Gunay, SELCUK Hatem Hakan, SOYSAL Aysun

Background - Metronidazole is a synthetic antibiotic, which has been commonly used for protozoal and anaerobic infections. It rarely causes dose - and duration - unrelated reversible neurotoxicity. It can induce hyperintense T2/FLAIR MRI lesions in several areas of the brain. Although the clinical status is catastrophic, it is completely reversible after discontinuation of the medicine. Case report - 36-year-old female patient who had recent brain abscess history was under treatment of metronidazole for 40 days. She admitted to Emergency Department with newly onset myalgia, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision and cerebellar signs. She had nystagmus in all directions of gaze, ataxia and incompetence in tandem walk. Bilateral hyperintense lesions in splenium of corpus callosum, mesencephalon and dentate nuclei were detected in T2/FLAIR MRI. Although lumbar puncture analysis was normal, her lesions were thought to be related to activation of the brain abscess and metronidazole was started to be given by intravenous way instead of oral. As lesions got bigger and clinical status got worse, metronidazole was stopped. After discontinuation of metronidazole, we detected a dramatic improvement in patient’s clinical status and MRI lesions reduced. Conclusion - Although metronidazole induced neurotoxicity is a very rare complication of the treatment, clinicians should be aware of this entity because its adverse effects are completely reversible after discontinuation of the treatment.

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2016

[Behavioral and cognitive profile of corpus callosum agenesia - Review]

LÁBADI Beatrix, BEKE Anna Mária

[Introduction - Agenesis of corpus callosum is a relatively frequent congenital cerebral malformation including dysplasia, total or partial absence of corpus callosum. The agenesis of corpus callosum can be occured in isolated form without accompanying somatic or central nervous system abnormalities and it can be associated with other central nervus system malformations. The behavioral and cognitive outcome is more favorable for patients with isolated agenesis of corpus callous than syndromic form of corpus callosum. The aim of this study is to review recent research on behavioral and social-cognitive functions in individuals with agenesis of corpus callosum. Developmental delay is common especially in higher-order cognitive and social functions. Methods - An internet database search was performed to identify publications on the subject. Results - Fifty-five publications in English corresponded to the criteria. These studies reported deficits in language, social cognition and emotions in individuals with agenesis of corpus callosum which is known as primary corpus callous syndrome. Discussion - The results indicate that individuals with agenesis of corpus callosum have deficiency in social-cognitive domain (recognition of emotions, weakness in paralinguistic aspects of language and mentalizing abilities). The impaired social cognition can be manifested in behavioral problems like autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2015

[Treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture with PMMA augmented pedicle screw fixation]

PADÁNYI Csaba, MISIK Ferenc, PAPP Zoltán, VITANOVICS Dusan, BALOGH Attila, VERES Róbert, LIPÓTH László, BANCZEROWSKI Péter

[Background - Over the last few decades many innovative operation technique were developed due to the increase of porotic vertebral fractures. These new techniques aim to reach the required stability of the vertebral column. In case of significant instability, spinal canal stenosis or neural compression, decompressive intervention may be necessary, which results in further weakening of the column of the spine, the minimal invasive percutan vertebroplasty is not an adequate method to reach the required stability, that is why insertion of complementary pedicular screws is needed. Considering the limited screw-fixing ability of the porotic bone structure, with this new technique we are able to reach the appropriate stability of cement-augmented pedicle screws by dosing cement carefully through the screws into the vertebral body. We used this technique in our Institute in case of 12 patients and followed up the required stability and the severity of complications. Methods - Fifteen vertebral compression fractures of 12 patients were treated in our Institute. Using the classification proposed by Genant et al. we found that the severity of the vertebral compression was grade 3 in case of 13, while grade 2 in case of two fractures. The average follow up time of the patients was 22 months (12-39), during this period X-ray, CT and clinical control examinations were taken. During the surgery the involved segments were localised by using X-ray and after the exploration the canulated screws were put through the pedicles of the spine and the vertebral body was filled through the transpedicular screws with bone cement. Depending on the grade of the spinal canal stenosis, we made the decompression, vertebroplasty or corpectomy of the fractured vertebral body, and the replacement of the body. Finally the concerned segments were fixed by titanium rods. Results - In all cases the stenosis of spinal canal was resolved and the bone cement injected into the corpus resulted in adequated stability of the spine. In case of six patients we observed cement extravasation without any clinical signs, and by one patient - as a serious complication - pulmonary embolism. Neurological progression or screw loosening were not detected during the follow up period. Part of the patients had residual disability after the surgery due to their older ages and the problem of their rehabilitation process. Conclusion - After the right consideration of indications, age, general health condition and the chance of successful rehabilitation, the technique appears to be safe for the patients. With the use of this surgical method, the stability of the spine can be improved compared to the preoperative condition, the spinal canal stenosis can be solved and the neural structures can be decompressed. The severity of complications can be reduced by a precise surgical technique and the careful use of the injected cement. The indication of the surgical method needs to be considered in the light of the expected outcome and the rehabilitation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2013

[Diffusion MRI measured white matter microstructure as a biomarker of neurodegeneration in preclinical Huntington’s disease]

KINCSES Tamás Zsigmond, SZABÓ Nikoletta, TÓTH Eszter, ZÁDORI Dénes, FARAGÓ Péter, NÉMETH Dezsõ, JANACSEK Karolina, BABOS Magor, KLIVÉNYI Péter, VÉCSEI László

[Background - Huntington’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, genetically determined by CAG trinucleotide expansions in the IT15 gene. The onset of the symptoms is related to the number of CAG triplets. Because the patients are asymptomatic in the early phase of the disease, in vivo biomarkers are needed to follow up the neurodegeneration and to test putative neuroprotective approaches. One such promising biomarker is the diffusion MRI measured microstructural alteration of the white matter. Methods - Seven presymtomatic, mutation carriers and ten age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Diffusion parameters were compared between groups and correlated with measures describing neurodegeneration. In order to reduce the possible misregistration bias due to atrophy the analysis was restricted to the core of each fibre bundles as defined by maximal fractional anisotropy (Tract- Based Spatial Statistics). Results - Decreased fractional anisotropy, along with increased mean, parallel and perpendicular diffusivity was found in white matter tracts, mainly in the corpus callosum. An inverse correlation was detected between the fractional anisotropy and neurodegeneration score (derived from the number of CAG triplets and the patient age) from the areas of the left precentral gyrus, frontal lobe, corpus callosum and the capsula extrema. Altered diffusion parameters are promising biomarkers of the neurodegeneration in Huntington’s disease.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 25, 2013

[The presentation of a transient hyperintense lesion with legionnaires disease in a patient, is it a coincidance or an incidental finding?]

KILIC Çoban Eda, AKSOY Selma, SAHIN Riza Ahmet, UZUN Nuray, GÖKYIGIT Münevver

[Up to date the presentation of transient splenial lesions in corpus callosum were reported in diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only in epileptic patients and patients under antiepileptic therapy. A 41 year old male with no previous medical history was admitted to our clinic with symptoms of pneumonia. The neurological exam revealed stupor, but when awake his speech and orientation were normal. There were no meningeal irritation signs, cranial nerves, piramidal and cerebellar functions were normal. He had moderate respiratory distress and had bilateral rales in lower lobes while oscultating. Laboratory tests revealed high liver function levels and high acute phase reactants. Arterial blood levels showed hypoxemia. A brain MRI showed a hypointensity in the splenium of corpus callosum on T1 weighted images. There was markedly increased signal in this region on diffusion weighted imaging and hypointense on ADC. The lesion was slightly hyperintense on T2 and FLAIR weighted images. A repeat brain MRI was done 30 days after the initial study and showed a complete resolution of the splenial lesion. Transient splenial lesions can be seen due to different mechanisms in different clinical settings. It should be noted that these lesions are mostly reversible. Unnecessary therapies and procedures should be avoided in these lesions.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 25, 2013

[Mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion in children]

LIPTAI Zoltán, IVÁDY Balázs, BARSI Péter, VÁRALLYAY György, RUDAS Gábor, FOGARASI András

[Authors, most of them Japanese, have recently published an increasing number of articles on mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion. We report on two new white European patients and compare published data with our own observations. A 15- year-old girl developed headache, fever, dizziness, vomiting and nuchal rigidity over four days. CSF showed elevated protein and cell count, with the lowest serum Na being 131 mmol/L. MRI on day seven was normal, but she remained febrile, had cerebral edema and episodes of confusion. MRI on day 11 showed a small T2-hyperintense lesion with restricted diffusion in the callosal splenium. Adenoviral infection was proved, and the girl underwent a protracted course of recovery. MRI signal changes improved in six days and disappeared after four months. A 12.5-year-old girl developed headache, lethargy, drowsiness and vomiting. On day five she experienced right-sided numbness, weakness and inability to speak which lasted 12 hours. She was confused and disoriented. MRI disclosed a tiny area of increased T2- signal and restricted diffusion in the splenium. Serum Na was 133 mmol/L, CSF cell count and protein was markedly elevated, and enteroviral infection was detected. Echocardiography showed no changes predisposing to clot formation and no thrombophilia was found. Her symptoms resolved in a week and MRI was normal two months later. These two non-epileptic children increase the small number of white European patients with MERS reported so far. Both had hyponatremia and encephalitis and patient 2 had transient ischemic attack, possibly due to the cerebral edema also resulting in the splenial lesion.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2012

[Selective ultrastructural vulnerability in the cuprizone-induced experimental demyelination]

ÁCS Péter, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Background and purpose - It has been reported that multiple sclerosis has four different neuropathological subtypes, and two of them (type III and IV) are characterized by primary oligodendrocyte loss. However, the exact pathomechanism that lead to oligodendrocyte apoptosis in human demyelinating diseases is still elusive. The copper chelator cuprizone induces primary oligodendrocyte apoptosis and consequent demyelination in well defined areas of the mouse brain. Nevertheless, the precise subcellular events that result in oligodendrocyte cell death in the cuprizone model are still unknown. We aimed to study the ultrastructural alterations that might induce oligodendrocyte apoptosis in the cuprizone experimental demyelination model. Methods - C57BL/6 mice were given cuprizone for two, 21 and 35 days to induce demyelination to investigate early pathological events, and different stages of demyelination. In addition, mice were given cuprizone for 35 days and were allowed to recover for two or 14 days to study early and late remyelination. After the cuprizone treatment, mice were sacrificed and the corpus callosum, the superior cerebellar peduncle, the optic nerve and the sciatic nerve were studied by electron microscopy. Results - The ultrastructural analysis revealed that cuprizone induced oligodendrocyte apoptosis is accompanied by the formation of giant mitochondria in the affected cells in the corpus callosum and in the superior cerebellar peduncle. Apoptosis of the myelin producing cells was present through the whole cuprizone challenge. Severe demyelination occurred after three weeks of cuprizone administration associated with massive macrophage infiltration and astrocytosis of the demyelinated areas. Axons and neurons remained unaffected. Conclusion - The formation of giant mitochondria in myelin producing oligodendrocytes is the first pathological sign in the cuprizone experimental demyelination. Mitochondrium pathology in the cuprizone challenge might serve as a useful model to study the pathomechanism of multiple sclerosis subtypes (III and IV) characterized by primary oligodendrocyte degeneration.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2009

[Myelination disturbance in a patient with hyperuricemia and hyperserotoninemia combined with 18q deletion syndrome]

LÁSZLÓ Aranka, VÖRÖS Erika, BUGA Klára, HORVÁTH Katalin, MAYER Péter, OSZTOVICS Magda†, PÁVICS László, SVEKUS András, PATTERSON C. Marc

[We previously reported a male patient with an 18q21.3 deletion, hyperuricemia and typical symptoms of the Lesch- Nyhan syndrome who lacked hypoxanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyl- transferase (HGPRT) deficiency. The patient developed progressive peripheral neuropathy in additon to his profound mental retardation and self-injurious behavior. At the age of 23 years MR imaging revealed globally delayed myelination with relative sparing of the corpus callosum and frontal lobes. They were focal hyperintensities suggestive of gliosis. Multimodality evoked potentials found evidence of impaired central and peripheral conduction. Single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging demonstrated left frontal hyperperfusion and under it a temporoparietal hypoperfusion.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 20, 2005

[EXPERIMENTAL DEMYELINATION CAUSED BY PRIMARY OLIGODENDROCYTE DYSTROPHY Regional distribution of the lesions in the nervous system of mice brain]

KOMOLY Sámuel

[Background and purpose - Heterogeneity of multiple sclerosis lesions has been recently indicated: In addition to T-cell-mediated or T-cell plus antibody-mediated autoimmune mechanisms (patterns I-II) two other patterns (III-IV) were described. Patterns III-IV are characterized by primary oligodendrocyte dystrophy, reminiscent of virus- or toxin-induced demyelination rather than autoimmunity. It was described more than 30 years ago that dietary application of a copper-chelating agent called cuprizone results in primary oligodendrocyte degeneration which is followed by demyelination. The aim of the present study was to examine the regional distribution of cuprizone induced oligodendrocyte dystrophy and demyelination in the nervous system of mice. Material a methods - Demyelination was induced in male weanling Swis-Webster mice by feeding them on a diet containing 0.6% (W/W) cuprizone bis(cyclohexanone)-oxalyldihydrazone (G. F. Smith Chemical, Columbus OH) for 8 weeks. Animals were sacrificed after 3, 7, 14, 27, 35, 56 days of cuprizone administration. Samples were taken from corpus callosum, anterior commissure, optic nerve, cervical spinal cord and sciatic nerve. Samples were examined by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization for myelin proteins and myelin protein mRNA-s, respectively. Conventional neuropathological stainings and electron microscopy was also performed. Results - Oligodendrocyte degeneration and demyelination followed a particular standard pattern in the central nervous system. Profound myelin loss developed in the superior cerebellar peduncle, anterior comissure and corpus callosum, whereas the optic nerves, velum medullare anterior and spinal cord showed little or no demyelination. Sciatic nerves were unaffected. No infiltration by lymphocytes or blood-brain barrier damage was observed during cuprizone treatment. Conclusion - Cuprizone induced oligodendrocyte damage and demyelination follows a particular standard pattern in the central nervous system of mice. Cuprizone induced demyelination might be considered as a model for human demyelinating disorders with primary oligodendrocyte dystrophy and apoptosis.]