Lege Artis Medicinae

[Why is it important and ethical to treat anxiety patients?]

RADICS Judit

JUNE 20, 2018

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2018;28(04-05)

[The identification of anxious patiens is not always an easy task. The diagnose is clear in that case, when the symptoms (psychic or somatic) are evident or/and patients complain about anxiety. Anxiety itself is not a pathological symptom if it is adequate in strength and duration. Anxiety reactions have large individual variety -, they are pathological if inadequate and irrelevante and don’t match with the actual situation. According to epidemilogical data one third of patients of family doctors suffer from anxiety but somatic symptoms come to the front, so the patients participate in a great number of medical examinations. It is important to emphasise that medical examinations are necessary to preclude the possibility of any somatic disease. The di­ag­nostic criteria of DSM-5. are an excellent assistance for a good diagnosis. Anxiety is a risk factor for cardiological diseases and diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of anxiety disorders are 12.6-17.2%. Anxiety di­sorders are well-manageable, they need complex therapy: benzodiazepines, antidepressants, hypnotics and psychotherapy. They frequently co-exist with depression and insomnia so they have to be treated together. ]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Concerning Madness for the Mad and Others]

GAJDOS Ágoston

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Autopsy by Pencil – When Anatomy and Art Meet ]

CZIGLÉNYI Boglárka

Lege Artis Medicinae

[In memoriam Prof. Dr. István Kiss (1952-2018)]

FARSANG Csaba, KAPÓCS Gábor, VÁLYI Péter, HOLLÓS Kata

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The “room” for death in the family - dying as a role]

MÚJDRICZA Ferenc

[The Hungarian literature has quite ignored so far Noyes & Clancy’s Role Theory approach of dying. I present the outline and a critique of this conception, then lay the foundations of a reformed concept of the dying role. For the optimal and desired dying role is not one of peripherising and objectifying, rather one of placing the dying in the centre of the system of relations and roles radically restructuring under the influence of such role. The personality of the dying remains a true value in this central position. The reintegration of the dying can begin parallel to her disintegration by the progressive loss of her normal social roles (‘the loneliness of the dying’). Death can thus transform into a social phenomenon. I illustrate the argumentation on the central dying role with a case study using the method of a heterophenomenological, second-person character. By promoting the central and autonomous dying role, i.e. by the development of the necessary social role competences, or at least by publicising the thanatological knowledge, death can turn from an avoided, socially disintegrative taboo into a phenomenon that can strengthen the community even after the dying departed.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Applying musical tools in healing children]

KOLLÁR János

[The aim of the study is drawing the attention to the possibilities of applying musical tools in healing children. After doing research in main medical databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Medline) some research works were discovered and harmonized in which the researchers give proof of the effectiveness of music therapies implemented in therapeutic circumstances and by proper experts on medical fields. The study focuses on the following topics: applying music for reducing stress caused by medical interventions and hospitalization, treating speech disturbances, improving communication and social abilities of autistic children, improving capabilities of people suffering from visual and hearing impairment, providing help during anaesthesia, stimulating different parts of the brain in children suffering from PDOC (Prolonged Disorder of Consciousness), improving capabilities of children living with disabilities and helping creating harmonic relationship between children, their parents and the healing staff. ]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[Tracing trace elements in mental functions]

JANKA Zoltán

[Trace elements are found in the living organism in small (trace) amounts and are mainly essential for living functions. Essential trace elements are in humans the chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), fluorine (F), iodine (I), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), and questionably the boron (B) and vanadium (V). According to the biopsychosocial concept, mental functions have biological underpinnings, therefore the impairment of certain neurochemical processes due to shortage of trace elements may have mental consequences. Scientific investigations indicate the putative role of trace element deficiency in psychiatric disorders such in depression (Zn, Cr, Se, Fe, Co, I), premenstrual dysphoria (Cr), schizophrenia (Zn, Se), cognitive deterioration/de­mentia (B, Zn, Fe, Mn, Co, V), mental retardation (I, Mo, Cu), binge-eating (Cr), autism (Zn, Mn, Cu, Co) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (Fe). At the same time, the excess quantity (chronic exposure, genetic error) of certain trace elements (Cu, Mn, Co, Cr, Fe, V) can also lead to mental disturbances (depression, anxiety, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction, insomnia). Lithium (Li), being efficacious in the treatment of bipolar mood disorder, is not declared officially as a trace element. Due to nutrition (drinking water, food) the serum Li level is about a thousand times less than that used in therapy. However, Li level in the red cells is lower as the membrane sodium-Li countertransport results in a Li efflux. Nevertheless, the possibility that Li is a trace element has emerged as studies indicate its potential efficacy in such a low concentration, since certain geographic regions show an inverse correlation between the Li level of drinking water and the suicide rate in that area. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Commemorating the Lipótmező. Part 1.]

RIHMER Zoltán

[“What did Lipótmező mean to you?” My friends and acquaintances asked frequently this question in the past decades, concerning the National Institute for Psychiatry and Neurology or well known as the Lipótmező my past workplace and the role it played in my life thus far. It is difficult to give a short answer, but the three and a half decades I have spent there were certainly of decisive importance in my professional and private life as well. Since I was banned from tobacco smoking due to my disease ten years ago, I cannot keep my pipe in my mouth any more. Thus, I decided to recollect the dearest stories kept in my memory, which had the deepest impact on me during my 35 years in Lipótmező both as a doctor and as a man. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Psychometric properties of the Hungarian Adult Attachment Scale]

KAPORNAI Krisztina, BAJI Ildikó, ŐRI Dorottya, KISS Enikő

[The revised Adult Attachment Scale (AAS) developed by N. L. Collins is a widely used questionnaire to measure adult attachment. However, its psychometric properties have not been investigated in Hungary. We aimed to confirm the key psychometric properties of the Hungarian version of the AAS focusing on reliability indices on a population that consis­ted of depressed and non-depressed young adults. The AAS is a self-report questionnaire, in which two different dimensional evaluating systems are possible: the original (close, depend, and anxiety) and the alternative scoring system (anxiety, avoidance). Our study population consisted of young adults with a history of major depression (n = 264, median age = 25.7 years) and their never-depressed biological siblings (n = 244, median age = 24.0). The internal consistency of close, anxiety, and avoidance scales were satisfactory (Cronbach-α >0.7). The consistency of the depend scale was slightly lower than expected (Cronbach-α = 0.62). Test-retest reliability was good for all of the scales, it ranged from 0.73 to 0.78 after 14 months of follow-up period. The scale showed good discrimination as tested by the differences of close and anxiety attachment dimensions between the groups (p<0.01). More­over, we were able to differentiate the currently dep­res­sed subjects based on these attachment dimensions. Explo­ra­tory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted, and a bifactor solution proved optimal model fit. The three dimensions of the AAS has not been confirmed. However, the close and anxiety scales of AAS were found to be adequate. Our results also indicate that attachment features correlate with major depressive episodes in adulthood.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Evaluation of anxiety, depression and marital relationships in patients with migraine

DEMIR Fıgen Ulku, BOZKURT Oya

Aim - The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of attacks in patients with migraine, to determine the effects of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and to evaluate the marital relationships of patients with migraine. Method - Thirty patients who were admitted to the neurology outpatient clinic of our hospital between July 2018 and October 2018 and were diagnosed with migraine according to the 2013 International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria were included in this cross-sectional study. Age, sex, headache frequency and severity, depressive traits, marital satisfaction and anxiety status were examined. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for measuring relevant parameters. Results - The mean severity of migraine pain according to VAS scale was 6.93 ± 1.41 and the mean number of migraine attacks was 4.50 ± 4.24. The mean BDI score of the patients was 12.66 ± 8.98, the mean MMQ-M score was 19.80 ± 12.52, the mean MMQ-S score was 13.20 ± 9.53, the mean STAI-state score was 39.93 ± 10.87 and the mean STAI-trait score was 45.73 ± 8.96. No significant correlation was found between age, number of migraine attacks, migraine duration, migraine headache intensity, and BDI, STAI and MMQ scores (p>0.05). But there was a positive correlation between MMQ-S and scores obtained from the BDI and STAI-state scales (p<0.05). Conclusion - In this study more than half of the migraine patients had mild, moderate or severe depression. A positive correlation was found between sexual dissatisfaction and scale scores of depression and anxiety.

Crisis in psychiatry