Lege Artis Medicinae

[Treatment of allergic rhinitis from clinical guidelines to rutin practice]

SZILASI Mária, FODOR Andrea

AUGUST 20, 2013

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2013;23(07-08)

[Clinical practice guidelines aim to improvethe quality of patient care by providing spe-cific recommendations for daily practice.Many factors may influence the implemen-tation of a guideline in practice. An ade-quate analysis of the barriers to guidelineadherence can help to improve it’s imple-mentation.]

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