Lege Artis Medicinae

[The association between advanced age and peripheral arterial disease]

KOLOSSVÁRY Endre1, FARKAS Katalin1

NOVEMBER 15, 2019

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2019;29(11)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33616/lam.29.047

[The high-income countries are characterized by the aging of the residents (epidemiological transition) and the change of the disease patterns that are recognized in the population (epidemiological transition). In that sense, considering the cardiovascular diseases in the last few decades, a decline of mortality of acute, fatal conditions (stroke, myocardial infarction) is notable. All these factors contributed to the recognition of the importance of peripheral arterial disease and related problems in the aging popula­tion of the affected people. The high prevalence, the decline of quality of life associated with compromised lower limb circula­tion, the risk of the limb loss, the challenge of rehabilitation and the high mortality represent a significant and increasing burden to the healthcare. The review aims to analyse the relation of the aging population and peripheral arterial disease, addressing the aspects of epidemiology, diagnostics, and therapy. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Szent Imre Egyetemi Oktatókórház, Angiológia

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Hypertension in the elderly ]

BARNA István

[Elevated isolated systolic pressure is the most common and greatest cardiovascular risk factor with age. The prevalence of hypertension increases with age and ex­ceeds 60% over 70 years. Proper treatment of hypertension in the elderly, even in very old age (> 80 years), increases life expectancy and reduces the risk of cardiovascular events. For patients over 65 years of age, the target blood pressure range is between 130-139 / 70-80 mmHg if the patient tolerates the treatment. In elderly patients with poorer conditions, systolic blood pressure may be <150 mmHg. White-coat hypertension is common, nondipper ratio is increased, autonomic nervous system dysregulation is more common, and orthostatic decrease of blood pressure. The renal function is decreased or already impaired, often resulting in poorer therapeutic cooperation due to impaired cognitive function. The blood pressure lowering effect of targeted lifestyle changes may be the same as medication monotherapy, with the main disadvantage of decreasing adherence over time, for which a proper physician-patient relationship is essential. First-line agents for the treatment of elderly hypertension include angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), long-acting calcium channel blockers, and thiazide, thiazide-like diuretics. Beta-blockers should be used in the treatment of elderly hypertension if they have other indications (coronary heart disease, heart failure, arrhythmias). More than 70% of hypertensive patients should use combination therapy to achieve target blood pressure. Take advantage of fixed dose combination to improve compliance to optimize treatment. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Vascular biomarkers ]

BENCZÚR Béla

[While risk scores are invaluable tools for adapted preventive strategies, a significant gap exists between predicted and actual event rates. Additional tools to further refine the risk stratification of patients at an individual level are biomarkers. A surrogate endpoint is a biomarker that is intended as a substitute for and being realized earlier than a clinical hard endpoint. In order to be suitable as a surrogate endpoint of cardiovascular events, a biomarker should meet several well-defined criteria. It has been proposed that a plenty of potential vascular biomarkers would have a role in primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention. Most of the biomarkers examined fit within the concept of early vascular aging. The only biomarkers that fulfill most of the criteria and, therefore, are close to being considered a clinical surrogate endpoint are carotid ultrasonography, ankle-brachial index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Black Magic, or Resurrecting the Dead Mother ]

GEREVICH József

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Ezetimibe-statin combination therapy]

REINHARDT István

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Preview of selected papers of the 3rd Hypertension Days in Szekszárd]

BENCZÚR Béla

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[TREATMENT OF HYPERTENSION - RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE PRACTICE]

PÁLL Dénes

[Hypertension is one of the most common diseases with a prevalence of over 25%. Despite of the availability of modern therapeutic options, the proportion of well-controlled patients is low. Before starting the treatment of patients with hypertension, it is essential to assess cardiovascular risk factors, co-morbidities and damages to target organs, in addition to repeated blood pressure measurements. The author first reviews the non-pharmacological treatment options of hypertension, then summarizes the most important characteristics of first-line antihypertensive agents (diuretics, beta-receptor blockers, calcium channel antagonists, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers). Considering the complex pathomechanism of essential hypertension, the author details the advantages and options of combined antihypertensive therapy, touching on the combinations recommended in special conditions. The metabolic effects and side-effects of antihypertensive agents, which have recently gained increased significance, are also discussed. Modern hypertension care is aimed at maximally decreasing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and improving the patient's quality of life. Maximum decrease of cardiovascular risk not only involves proper blood pressure control, but also aggressive fight against other risk factors (e.g., diabetes, dyslipidaemia, smoking) and treatment of target organ damages and comorbidities.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES IN HUNGARY AFTER THE MILLENNIUM]

VOKÓ Zoltán, SZÉLES György, KARDOS László, NÉMETH Renáta, ÁDÁNY Róza

[INTRODUCTION - Here we present the descriptive epidemiology of stroke in Hungary including mortality, morbidity, functional limitation and inpatient care based on the most recent health statistical data. METHODS - Mortality data were analysed by direct and indirect standardisation, and geographical mapping based on empirical Bayesian smoothing. Morbidity data were obtained from the General Practitioners’ Morbidity Sentinel Station Program and the National Health Surveys. The latter also provided data on functional limitation. Data on inpatient service were taken from the European Hospital Morbidity Database of WHO. RESULTS - Hungarian stroke mortality continued to decrease in recent years, and the slope of the decrease was larger than in Western Europe. Stroke mortality was highest in the Northern- Hungarian Region, and in Somogy and Zala counties. The incidence of stroke was 1.5-2 times higher than in the developed countries in most age groups. Over 64 years of age, a decline of stroke incidence was observed, especially in men. In this age group approximately 10% of men and 7% of women had already had a stroke. Of these patients more than 10% needed assistance to get out of the bed, dress up, or eat. Hospitals reported more than 60 000 stroke cases in 2005. CONCLUSION - Despite the promising trends in stroke mortality and now also in morbidity, both indices are still rather high in Hungary compared to those in Western-Europe. The relatively favourable epidemiological changes, however, may be overridden by the increased stroke burden resulting from the aging of the population.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Hypertension in the elderly - critical review of diagnostic-therapeutic guidelines and their background]

SZÉKÁCS Béla

[In the majority of old and very old hypertensive patients, the reduction of abnormally high blood pressure has been proved to provide a strategic defense of target organs. In patients younger than 80 years, both initial and target blood pressure (BP) values are similar to those of younger age groups. In those older than 80 years, a a systolic blood pressure level >160 mmHg is the threshold of indication for antihypertensive treatment and the therapeutic target value is<150 mmHg. Both values are evidence- based (HYVET). The latest ACCF/AHA guidelines (USA 2011) advise to achieve a BP below 140 mmHg if the use of one or two antihypertensive agents result in sufficient BP reduction. However, this strategy is not yet supported by unequivocal evidence regarding complications in target organs. It is not recommended to aim for target levels lower than the above values (especially the value defined by the ESH guidelines) even in elderly hypertensive patients at high cardiovascular risk, as the results of several studies suggest a J-curve effect. In multimorbid elderly patients it is highly important to adapt antihypertensive treatment to individual needs, rather than to use schematic approaches. The number and progression of comorbid diseases can greatly influence, in certain cases attenuate the aimed BP reduction. A similar medical decision should be made if the target BP level could only be achieved by the combination of multiple antihypertensive medications, which can remarkably impair quality of life in elderly patients. Among non-comorbid elderly patients with hypertension, there seems to be no convincing difference in the efficiency of target organ protection between antihypertensive treatments that have different target sites but can achieve similar target levels. However, the majority of elderly hypertensive patients have comorbidities with variable rates of progression. In those at even low cardiometabolic risk the use of beta-receptor blockers (BRB) and especially a combination of BRB+diuretic (DIU) is not recommended. The adequate therapeutic tactic includes the use of only moderate drug-doses and their early combination. This approach has been convincingly proved mainly with early combinations of RAS inhibitors+CCB-s and RAS inhibitors+small doses of DIU-s. It is very important to monitor the treated patients, as the BP and circulatory response to the same antihypertensive treatment can markedly change in elderly patients when either the enviromental conditions change or a new pathologic process develops and/or is treated. Strict control is also necessary because it occurs quite often that the earlier optimal compliance of elderly patients in taking antihypertensive medicines rapidly deteriorates. The efficiency of statins and acetylsalicylic acid decreases over 80 years of age, but this does not indicate that the previously efficient approach should be suspended.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[End state AIDS patient at an intensive care unit - a case report with unconventional lessons]

ORTUTAY András, MARJANEK Zsuzsa, NAGY Károly, RÁCZ József, BARCS István

[A 26 year old male patient with unknown medical background had been admitted at the Department of Anestesiology and Intensive Therapy of the Jávorszky Ödön Hospital in the city of Vác. His HIV positivity had been revealed only at the 8th day of his hospitalization. He was living in a small settlement as an i.v. drug user, unknown to the drug prevention system or the STD primary care providing network. Being an end state AIDS patient, the time of the infection, the number of his contact persons, the source of the infection and the previous epidemiological pathway were not known. With this case report we would like to call attention to the importance of the differential diagnosis of AIDS disease, the role of the proper safety regulations concerning potentially infected and infected persons, the epidemiological importance of undiagnosed infections, and the extension of drug prevention services reachable for all persons in need. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Genetic diagnostics of the trombosis risk]

SZOKOLAI Viola, HARSÁNYI Gergely, VÉGH Csaba, ELBERT Gábor, TÚRI Sándor, NAGY Zsolt B.

[The cardiovascular system and the coalugation process play essential role in regulating the homestasis of the human body. Thrombuses may appear in veins (venous thrombosis) as well as arteries (arterial thrombosis) that may cause a wide range of ischemic vascular diseases. By mapping genetic risk factors that may accelarate the development of thrombosis, the quality of medical preventions and therapies can be improved. The most frequent gene mutations (FII, FV, PAI-1, MTHFR and EPCR gene polimorphisms) can be tested by methods based on PCR, real-time PCR and macroarray techniques. Professionals may use genetic results for selecting appropriate and optimal therapies based on the context of a patient’s medical history.]