Lege Artis Medicinae

[Tarnabod – Living on the Edge of Society]

SZALAI László

FEBRUARY 20, 2010

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2010;20(02)

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LŐRINCZ Jenő

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[Our Monthly Contest – Physicians in Literature]

MEZÔVÁRI Gyula

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VÁRADI András

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[Dangers of the use of performance enhancement drugs and food supplements]

PUCSOK József

[The history of humankind is full of stories related to performance enhancement drug abuse. For the purpose of improving explosive power and long-term physical performance central nervous system stimulating drugs and supplements, such as: amphetamine and cocaine have been used. Androgenic anabolic steroids are used for increasing skeletal muscle mass. The abuse of performance enhancer drugs is seriously deteriorating the human health, and have several negative side effects. Number of food-supplements - available in the market, often contain traces of steroids. So called designer steroids are extremely dangerous. In the near future it will be possible to enhance physical performance through genetic interventions.]

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