Lege Artis Medicinae

[SPONTANEOUS RUPTURE OF THE SPLEEN IN PULMONARY FIBROSIS]

SZOLNOKI Erzsébet, DEZSŐ Balázs, SZILASI Mária

JULY 14, 2008

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2008;18(06-07)

[INTRODUCTION - Splenic peliosis is a pathological entity; it is only mentioned in case reports in the literature. CASE REPORT - A 61-year-old man with hypertension and diabetes mellitus presented with effort dyspnoe that was subsequently found to be due to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis by histological examination. During steroid therapy, a spontaneous splenic rupture developed, which the patient fortunately survived. There was no need for splenectomy, but the clinical course suggested splenic peliosis. CONCLUSION - In this case, splenic rupture was associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a constellation that has not yet been reported. Nevertheless, it was an isolated rupture, with no similar haemorrhagic lesion of other parenchymal organs. In view of the literature data, beside primary disease steroid therapy and the coexisting diabetes may also have played a role in the development of the spontaneous splenic rupture.]

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[INTRODUCTION - Buerger’s disease is a nonatherosclerotic, segmental, inflammatory, progressive obliterative disease of the blood vessels that most commonly affects the small and medium-sized arteries and also the veins of the lower limb. It is strongly associated with tobacco use. CASE REPORT - A 37-year-old heavy smoker forest worker presented with severe gangrenous changes on the fingers as the upper limb manifestations of Buerger’s disease, which required acral amputation. After complex medical treatment, pharmacological sympathectomy on the left side and surgical sympathectomy on the right side, bilateral conserving necrectomy, cessation of smoking and 2 cycles of cyclophosphamid, the patient's status significantly improved, his pain diminished and, although to a limited extent, he could use both hands. CONCLUSIONS - Buerger’s disease is a disorder with unclear aethiology and is difficult to diagnose. Despite of a good prognosis, a causal treatment is not yet possible, so any antithrombotic, haemorheological, vasodilator or immunosuppressive therapy that have been reported to have beneficial effect should be considered for treatment.]

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