Lege Artis Medicinae

[Physicians in Movies]

GRÉTSY Zsombor

SEPTEMBER 19, 2007

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2007;17(08-09)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[NON-INVASIVE CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY BY MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY]

PRÉDA István, KERECSEN Gábor, MAUROVICH-HORVAT Pál

[This review summarizes the diagnostic spectrum, ways of application and methodological difficulties of multislice computed tomographic (MSCT) coronary angiography. The non-invasive assessment of cardiac and coronary anatomy is now possible with computed tomographic coronary angiography using the modern 16 to 64-slice technology. This technique finds its main use today in the screening of patients with moderate probability of having coronary artery disease (atypical chest pain). Its negative predictive value varies between 97% and 99%, thus, a negative result of this non-invasive outpatient procedure can reduce the possibility of coronary artery disease to the minimum. Other important diagnostic applications include the follow-up of patients with coronary artery bypass, accurate diagnosis of coronary artery anomalies, and the simultaneous examination of the heart and great vessels. The future development of the technique is directed to coronary plaque characterization, particularly the detection of vulnerable plaques. The radiation exposure is relatively low (7-13 mSv), comparable with that of invasive coronary angiography.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Current Changes to the Domestic Drug Market]

GÁLNÉ Knippel Barbara

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Vascular malformations in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome recognised by endoscopy]

KOVÁCS Márta, REUSZ György, SZABÓ Attila, DEZSŐFI Antal, GYŰRŰS Péter, JÁNOKI Márta, RÁCZ István

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Differences in the Prolonged Use of Drugs for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease]

BALIKÓ Zoltán

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Comparison of the extended-release dipyridamole-ASA combination with clopidogrel in patients with strokes]

SZAPÁRY László

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Oncology

[Burnout syndrome - prevention and treatment]

SZY Ágnes

[The defi nition of burnout syndrome was established due to the recognition of changes that practising physicians experienced in their affective state and behaviour as well as the observation of physical symptoms that put their health at risk. Burnout syndrome can be characterised by a triadic set of factors: emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and decline of professional achievement. The present article aims to describe burnout syndrome with regard to the fact that similarities and differences between burnout syndrome and affective disorders such as depression must be highlighted. The focus of this article is that health care professionals burnout is multicausal and it is insuffi cient to put only the individual in the spotlight although it is imperative that we attend to the individual fi rst. It is essential to highlight the fact that without changes in the institutional work culture and requirements the prevalence of burnout syndrome can hardly decrease. It is also the aim of this work to provide the practising health care professional with information that they can easily transform into immediate help.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Who are the happy family physicians in Hungary?]

GYŐRFFY Zsuzsa, TORZSA Péter

[INTRODUCTION - Mental and somatic morbidity of healers is the most commonly researched issue in physician related studies. Few of them focus on the positive as-pects of the physicians’ profession though. METHODS - A focus group qualitative study of family physicians (n=14), who work in Budapest, was conducted. Three important topics were analyzed in this study - the positive aspects of the daily routine, the issue of the work-family balance and the decisive aspects of the patient - doctor relationship. RESULTS - The main positive elements of the family physicians’ professional lives are the independent working conditions, the diversity of patients, an intensive relationship with families and communities, and a special patient-doctor relationship. Beside professional fulfilment, the possibility of ba­lance between work,family and private time are the key components of their wellbeing. CONCLUSIONS - According to both our results and the findings of international literature, the happiness of family physicians depends on independence. This independence is present in their professional life, in the balance of work and family life and in time management as well.]

Clinical Oncology

[The role of artifi cial intelligence in precision medicine]

MESKÓ Bertalan

[The essence of practicing medicine has been obtaining as much data about the patient’s health or disease as possible and making decisions based on that. Physicians have had to rely on their experience, judgement, and problem-solving skills while using rudimentary tools and limited resources. With the cultural transformation called digital health, disruptive technologies have started to make advanced methods available not only to medical professionals but also to their patients. These technologies such as genomics, biotechnology, wearable sensors, or artifi cial intelligence (AI) are gradually leading to three major directions. They have been (1) making patients the point-of-care; (2) created a vast amount of data that require advanced analytics; and (3) made the foundation of precision medicine. Instead of developing treatments for populations and making the same medical decisions based on a few similar physical characteristics among patients, medicine has shifted toward prevention, personalization, and precision. In this shift and cultural transformation, AI is the key technology that can bring this opportunity to everyday practice.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Young Physicians Awarded by the Romics Foundation]

KUN J. Viktória