Lege Artis Medicinae

[Physician attitudes concerning complementary and alternative medicine]

ZÖRGŐ Szilvia, GYŐRFFY Zsuzsa

OCTOBER 20, 2016

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2016;26(09-10)

[INTRODUCTION - A crucial challenge for XXI. century health care is the presence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). A marked question of professional discourse has been characterizing patient CAM use, yet the attitudes, knowledge, and opinions of physicians have received far less attention. METHODS - This qualitative study involves semi-structured interviews conducted with 45 physicians. The narratives were scrutinized by employing Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) via At­las.ti software. RESULTS - The narratives were coded ac­cording to attitudes and opinions concerning CAM, and subsequently participants were placed into 3 main groups. The first group is distinguished by a total rejection of CAM (n=11), while at the other end of the continuum, participants integrated biomedicine with CAM therapies (n=8). Those participants in between the two poles (rejection and integration) were characterized as „acceptance with reservations” and signify a heterogeneous category regarding composition and attitudes. COMMENTS - Most participants in our sample belonged to the „acceptance with reservations” category, that is, physicians who do not employ CAM in their praxis, albeit support their patients should they decide to utilize a CAM modality. Our inquiry aims to serve as a precursor to a quantitative study concerning CAM use.]

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