Lege Artis Medicinae

[Mirror neurons and interpersonality in the paradigm of embodied mind]

HORVÁTH Lajos, SZABÓ Attila

DECEMBER 18, 2013

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2013;23(12)

[In this paper, our aim is to scrutinise the psychology and phenomenology of interpersonal relationships from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. This multi-perspectival examination has a key concept: we critically discuss the interdisciplinary dialogues and philosophical appraisals regarding the issue of mirror neurons. Empathy and resonance phenomena have philosophical, psychological, and biomedical importance. Our paper, by applying certain philosophical and empirical results of the overarching paradigm of embodiment, attempts to shed light on several semantic problems, which could come up with respect to the function of mirror-neurons. In conclusion, we would like to attempt to utilise the results of contemporary phenomenology in order to clear some semantic problems, considering the features of mirroring and resonant behaviour.]

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