Lege Artis Medicinae

[Interrelations between antidepressants and diabetes]

HARGITTAY Csenge1, GONDA Xénia2, MÁRKUS Bernadett1, VÖRÖS Krisztián1, TABÁK Gy. Ádám3, KALABAY László1, RIHMER Zoltán2, TORZSA Péter1

APRIL 18, 2020

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2020;30(04-05)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33616/lam.30.016

[Diabetes and depression are frequent comorbidities. They are a heavy burden by themselves, however, as comorbidities increase additionally the number of diabetes-related complications, morbidity, and mortality. In the background of interrelations, there are both well-known and hypothetical mechanisms. The aim of the present review is to outline these interrelations between antidepressants and diabetes and to discuss the effect of medications on carbohydrate metabolism respectively. Anti­depressant treatment on the one hand may improve mood, cognitive function and medication adherence leading to an improved glucose metabolism, on the other hand through their metabolic side effects, they may worsen carbohydrate metabolism. Concerning metabolic side effects, selec­tive serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the sa­fest, while tricyclic antidepressants and mo­noamine oxidase inhibitors should be administered under close monitoring. Se­rotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors may deteriorate gly­cae­mic control via increased noradre­nergic activation. Novel antidepressants, how­ever, have a neutral or positive impact on gly­caemic measures. Screening for and temporally adjusted treatment of depres­sion may decrease the risk of comorbidities ge­nerated complications. While caring for diabetic patients with depression, one should consider metabolic side effects of antidepressants and close monitoring of carbohydrate metabolism.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Családorvosi Tanszék, Budapest
  2. Semmelweis Egyetem Általános Orvostudományi Kar Pszichiátriai és Pszichoterápiás Klinika
  3. Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Belgyógyászati és Onkológiai Klinika, Budapest

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