Lege Artis Medicinae

[Inhibition of thrombocyte aggregation in patients with lower-limb vasoconstriction - Do we really treat them well?]

JÁRÁNYI Zsuzsanna

JUNE 20, 2011

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2011;21(06-07)

[Due to the prevalence and significant mortality of peripheral vascular diseases, their treatment requires special attention. PATIENTS - We examined 45 patients awaiting vascular surgery at the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery at Semmelweis University. RESULTS - We have demonstrated that the routine administration of acetylsalicylic acid was ineffective in the majority (60%) of patients, especially in the at-risk groups. In contrast, clopidogrel therapy was ineffective in only 11% of patients. CONCLUSIONS - On the basis of the literature and our own studies, we consider clopidogrel as the first-choice drug for the inhibition of thrombocyte aggregation in all patients with vascular disease, and for primary prevention in at-risk groups.]

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