Lege Artis Medicinae

[In the focus: steatohepatitis - Readers questions answered by dr. István Tornai]

TORNAI István

NOVEMBER 19, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(11)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[I Still Have So Much to Do... A Discussion with Éva Csatár MD]

VARGA Brigitta

Lege Artis Medicinae

[A NEW WAY TO TREAT ALLERGIC ASTHMA: ANTI-IGE THERAPY]

MAGYAR Pál

[Immunoglobulin E (IgE) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of the inflammation of the bronchial mucosa and airway hyperreactivity, which in turn produces the symptoms of allergic bronchial asthma. Omalizumab, the recently developed anti-IgE monoclonal antibody binds to the Cε3 region of the IgE molecule and thus prevents binding of the IgE to the surface of FCεRI receptor bearing cells (mast cells, basophils and antigen presenting dendritic cells). In the absence of cell-bound IgE, these cells are not activated and thus do not release inflammatory mediators and proinflammatory cytokines upon allergen exposition. Treatment with omalizumab significantly decreases the number of bronchial mucosal eosinophils and FCεRI positive cells, and the FCεRI receptor expression of the latter. Double blind controlled clinical studies have demonstrated that omalizumab treatment reduces the number of exacerbations and emergency room visits, the β2-agonist requirement and the dose of inhaled steroids, improves exspiratory airflow limitation, asthmatic symptoms and asthma-related quality of life in patients with moderate to severe allergic asthma. Low baseline FEV1, the use of high dose inhaled corticosteroids and a history of emergency asthma treatment in the past year are significant predictors of a better response to omalizumab. Omalizumab is tolerated well by patients. With the exception of local skin reactions, no significant difference in adverse events between patients taking omalizumab and control groups have been reported. According to the GINA (Global Initiative for Asthma) stepwise therapy protocol of asthma, omalizumab is indicated for severe asthmatics whose symptoms can not be controlled by inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2 agonists.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Great Binge Eating The Psychology and Symbols of Eating]

TÚRY Ferenc, PÉTER Orsolya Márta

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Rossini’s Mood Disorder]

KÖVES Péter

Lege Artis Medicinae

[RIO-Europe]

MATOS Lajos

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

The methylation status of NKCC1 and KCC2 in the patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy

UNAL Yasemin, KARA Murat, GENC Fatma, OZTURK Aslan Dilek, GÖMCELI Bicer Yasemin, KAYNAR Taner, TOSUN Kursad, KUTLU Gülnihal

Purpose - Methylation is a key epigenetic modification of DNA and regarding its impact on epilepsy, it is argued that “DNA methylation may play an important role in seizure susceptibility and maintenance of the disorder”. DNA methylation status of KCC2 (SCL12A5) and NKCC1 (SCL12A2) associated with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy was investigated in our study. Materials and methods - Thirty-eight patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who were diagnosed by video EEG monitoring and 32 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Twenty-three patients in TLE group were men and the remaining 15 were women. Among them, 27 had unilateral temporal focus (9 with right; 18 with left) and 11 patients had bilateral TLE. We analyzed promoter region methylation status of the KCC2 (SCL12A5) and NKCC1 (SCL12A2) genes in the case and control groups. Gene regions of interest were amplified through PCR and sequencing was accomplished with pyro-sequencing. Results - We found a significant relationship between TLE and methylation on the NKCC1. However, there was no association between TLE and methylation on the KCC2 gene. Also, we found no association between right or left and unilateral or bilateral foci of TLE. There was no relationship between TLE and methylation on the NKCC1and KCC2 genes in terms of mesial temporal sclerosis in cranial MRI, head trauma or febrile convulsions. Conclusion - The methylation of NKCC1 can be a mecha­nism of refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. There are limited findings about DNA methylation in TLE. Therefore, further studies with large sample sizes are necessary.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Family planning in multiple sclerosis: conception, pregnancy, breastfeeding]

RÓZSA Csilla

[Family planning is an exceptionally important question in multiple sclerosis, as women of childbearing age are the ones most often affected. Although it is proven that pregnancy does not worsen the long-term prognosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, many patients are still doubtful about having children. This question is further complicated by the fact that patients – and often even doctors – are not sufficiently informed about how the ever-increasing number of available disease-modifying treatments affect pregnancies. Breastfeeding is an even less clear topic. Patients usually look to their neurologists first for answers concerning these matters. It falls to the neurologist to rationally evaluate the risks and benefits of contraception, pregnancy, assisted reproduction, childbirth, breastfeeding and disease modifying treatments, to inform patients about these, and then together come to a decision about the best possible therapeutic approach, taking the patients’ individual family plans into consideration. Here we present a review of relevant literature adhering to international guidelines on the topics of conception, pregnancy and breastfeeding, with a special focus on the applicability of approved disease modifying treatments during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The goal of this article is to provide clinicians involved in the care of MS patients with up-to-date information that they can utilize in their day-to-day clinical practice. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Care of patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis]

PALLA László, BALOGH Zoltán

[Aim of the research: Assessment of workers’ knowledge regarding patients suffering from a rare neurological disorder, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Research and sampling methods: The target groups were: intensive care unit (Group I) and home care service nurses (Group II). The authors chose a self-developed questionnaire study, what was filled out on www.online.kerdoiv.com by 161 nurses. Results: Considering graduation from Group I. 17 (20%), from Group II, 27 (36%) have diploma in nursing education. Based on the answers, the ratio of the results are almost identical. Over 40% declare that they do not have sufficient knowledge, nurses can professional protocols in practice, but not always correctly. Taking the recommendation over 70% of answered the questions correctly. More than 95% of the two surveyed agreed, that they are able to give advice on care. 18.87% of Group I, and 20.97% of Group II attend case discussions weekly. Conclusions: Nurses need to supplement their knowledge about the disease, and technical protocol. Additional information needed to develop the competencies of communication among nurses. I would consider to develop a practice guideline on the disease, which members of the care team will uniformly apply. ]