Lege Artis Medicinae

[IN-FAMILY VIOLENCE IN CONNECTION WITH HEAVY DRINKING]

BÁCSKAI Erika, GEREVICH József

JANUARY 21, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(01)

[The interdisciplinary question of in-family violence has been being researched for a long time. The major part of this problem is related to the connection between heavy drinking and infamily violence. The background of its importance can mainly be found in all of those social, economic and personal losses and expenses, which result in the number of missed working hours, the costs of sanitary, police, judicial, punishment cases, nonmaterial harms and personal tragedies. Considering that the question of in-family violence related to alcohol consumption has never been a subject to systematic research in Hungary, Research Institute of Addictology made an attempt to analyse the alcohological relations of in-family violence in course of the research project called 'Violent behaviour in family patients treated with alcohol problems in the domestic abuse'. Detailed plan of the research can be found on the webpage of the institute (www.adki.hu). Within the scope of this project we first surveyed the international technical literature of in-family violence. When editing the themes we worked according to the so-called Mendeleyev-table, which means the collection of technical literature from (mainly American) full-text databases accessible on the Internet while putting the possible themes into logical order.]

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