Lege Artis Medicinae

[IMMUNE-MEDIATED NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS]

CSÉPÁNY Tünde

JULY 14, 2008

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2008;18(06-07)

[Multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis and chronic inflammatory neuropathies share the common feature of chronic course with potential development of disability due to the damage caused by immunological processes. Early detection and precise diagnosis is very important, because most patients respond well to proper immunomodulatory treatment. The diagnosis requires extensive knowledge of the disease and is based on the clinical symptoms recognised by the GP, as well as on complex assessment of the results of special neurophysiological, radiological and laboratory examinations. The present paper reviews the major immune-mediated neurological disorders and discusses their targeted immunological treatment.]

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