Lege Artis Medicinae

[EXERCISE-INDUCED BRONCHOCONSTRICTION]

VIZI Éva, CSOMA Zsuzsanna, HUSZÁR Éva

DECEMBER 20, 2003

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2003;13(08)

[Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction describes the transient narrowing of the airways occurring during and most often after vigorous exercise. The mechanism of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction remains elusive, although airway drying and cooling plays a prominent role. The severity of this reaction depends on the temperature and the water content of the inspired air, the type and concentration of air pollutants inspired and the intensity of the exercise. Diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction should include baseline spirometry followed by an exercise challenge test. The exercise can be a free-running test or a laboratory based test using a cycle-ergometer or a treadmill. Pre- and post-exercise pulmonary function should be compared, 10%-15% postexercise fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) is used as a diagnostic criteria (10% in laboratory test, 15% in free-running test). Heat loss, water loss, post exertional airway rewarming and the role of several mediators have been proposed as possible mechanisms responsible for the airway obstruction induced by exercise. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction can be easily diagnosed and treated in the majority of patients. When properly treated, asthmatic individuals should be able to participate or compete in the majority of sports.]

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