Lege Artis Medicinae

[Digitally-assisted treatment planning in precision oncology]

PETÁK István1,2, VÁLYI-NAGY István3

APRIL 18, 2020

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2020;30(04-05)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33616/lam.30.019

Review

[The progress of molecular information based on personalized precision medicine has reached a new milestone. Actually, about 6 million mutations of 600 genes may be related to the development of cancer, and on average, 3-4 of these “driver” mutations are present in each patient. Due to the progress in molecular diagnostics, we can now routinely identify the molecular profile of tumors in clinical settings. By clinical translation, there are actually available more than 125 targeted pharmaceuticals and hundreds of such therapies are under clinical trial. As a result, we have many first-line and licenced treatment options to be elected by molecular information as the optimal one for every patient. There is an increasing need for complex informatics solutions by medical software. Geneticists, molecular biologists, molecular pathologists, molecular pharmacologists are already using bioinformatics and interpretation software on their daily work. Today, online digital tools of artificial intelligence are also available for physicians for assisted treatment planning. Telemedicine, videoconferencing provide solutions for interdisciplinary virtual molecular tumor boards, which democratizes the access to precision oncology for all doctors and patients. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Oncompass Medicine Hungary Kft. Budapest
  2. Semmelweis Egyetem Farmakológiai és Farmakoterápiás Intézet Budapest
  3. Dél-pesti Centrumkórház Országos Hematológiai és Infektológiai Intézet Budapest

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