Lege Artis Medicinae

[CURRENT PRACTICAL VACCINOLOGY]

JELENIK Zsuzsanna

OCTOBER 20, 2004

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2004;14(10)

[The author deals with the current situation and new trends of vaccinology by focusing on the interests of practitioners. The main topics are the changes of antigens (such as pertussis, measles, or poliomyelitis) to provide better efficacy and milder reactogenity or less adverse events. Purifying the vaccines, like thiomersal and human proteins free vaccines is another proven method to achieve better safety. New antigens e.g. Rota, Lyme, meningococcus B are in the pipeline of vaccinology. The aim of producing a combined vaccine is to achieve immunity against more diseases with less inconvenience for the patient, while achieving higher vaccine coverage (DPT-Hib-HBV-IPV). The epidemiological and clinical experiences will influence the current vaccine schedule such as revaccinations of MMR, and remove the need for revaccinations of BCG and hepaB. The special target groups of immunizations are the elderly and patients with chronic disease. Groups of specialists are working on the vaccine recommendation guidelines for certain risk groups. At the same time, with the successful eradication of polio in Europe the practitioners now have to face the antivaccination movement, as well. The main tools to convince people about the benefit of vaccinations are health education and information.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF WHIPPLE'S DISEASE IN A PATIENT WITH LYMPH NODE ENLARGEMENT]

SOMOGYI Ágota, SZABÓ Tamás, KISHÁZI Péter, KISS Erika, ARATÓ Gabriella, PÁL Katalin, MADÁCSY László

[INTRODUCTION - Intestinal lipodystrophy, Whipple’s disease is an uncommon, chronic, systemic bacterial infection. It occurs predominantly in Caucasian males older than 40 years. The gastrointestinal tract is the most frequently involved organ, with clinical manifestations such as abdominal pain, malabsorption syndrome with diarrhea and weigth loss. Patient may present with low grade fever or fever of unknown origin, arthritis, lymphadenopathy, skin hyperpigmentation, endocarditis, pleuritis and peripheral and central neurological manifestations. Due to the wide variability of symptoms, the clinical diagnosis is very difficult and it is often made only years or even decades after the initial presentation. CASE REPORT - A 51-year-old Caucasian race man was admitted to the hospital with weigth loss and signs of subileus, referred for suspected lymphoma. After the exploratory laparotomy and lymphadenectomy the histological and the electron microscopical diagnosis was Whipple’s disease which was confirmed with histology from deep duodenal biopsy. Trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole therapy for 6 months resulted in complete clinical and molecular biological healing. CONCLUSION - Clinical signs of Whipple’s dease are non-specific and may mimic Crohn’s disease, coeliac disease, amyloidosis, macroglobulinaemia, histoplasmosis, infection with non-tuberculotic mycobacterium in AIDS patients and lymphomas. Therefore, differential diagnosis is of critical importance. The natural evolution of the disease without treatment is always fatal. Trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole for at least 1 year is usually considered adequate to eradicate the infection.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[13th European Stroke Conference]

KÁPOSZTA Zoltán

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Fiasco]

FRENKL Róbert

Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE CARE OF CHILDREN WITH CLEFT LIP AND PALATE IN THE GENERAL PRACTICE]

HIRSCHBERG Jenő

[The cleft lip and palate (i.e. facial cleft) is a frequent and distorting abnormality. The basics of the successful management are the early introduction of therapy and a well-trained team with all relevant specialists included (surgeon, otolaryngologist, orthodontist, speech therapist) as well as good collaboration with the parents and general practitioners being also an important factor. The author with his co-workers has performed more than 6000 surgeries in about 3500 children with facial cleft in the last 45 years and has treated 60-70 patients annuallly with velopharyngeal insufficiency without cleft. According to his experience and international data he summarizes the etiology, pathomechanism of facial clefts and discusses its symptoms, functional consequences and the surgical and conservative solutions are suggested. The recent Hungarian prevalence is 1:500. Specific prevention does not exist, the 5-6% recurrent cleft risk may be decreased to half by administration of folic acid. The generally accepted timing of the lip plasty is the 3-month age. The palatoplasty may be performed in one or two stages, but closure of the velum should be made before the development of speech by all means. The logopedic treatment (speech therapy) should be started, if the speech disorder is already obvious and the child is able to cooperate with the speech therapist. If conservative therapy is unsuccessful, (velo)pharyngoplasty is proposed at the age of 5. The orthodontic treatment should begin in mixed dentition, major nose correction and oral surgery are allowed only after puberty. Just because of a cleft the infant does not aspirate, the brestfeeding is beneficial and could be performed in most cases. Regular hearing control is recommended because of frequent ear and hearing problems. It is suggested to provide the parents with written instruction about outcome, prognosis and timetable of management, which could be helpful also for the general practitioners.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[TRANSBRONCHIAL NEEDLE ASPIRATION IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF SARCOIDOSIS]

ZSIRAY Miklós, BADÁR Éva, UDUD Katalin, FÜLÖP Andrea, SZABÓ Zsuzsanna, MATESZ István, MARKÓCZY Zsolt

[INTRODUCTION - The histological pattern of sarcoidosis and cytological characteristics are similarly unspecific. Nevertheless, both forms of the diagnosis based on morphology can be taken into consideration if the clinical picture and chest X-ray respectively, are fitted and other diseases are excluded. PATIENTS, METHOD AND RESULTS - Enlargement of hilar lymph nodes is present in 80% of cases of sarcoidosis. In this study, transcarinal needle aspiration combined with rapid on-site cytological staining was performed in the case of 33 patients with I. or II. stage of sarcoidosis. The sensitivity was found to be 76%. CONCLUSION - Since the cytologist can inform the bronchologist fairly soon: during the bronchoscopy, bronchial mucosal biopsies or transbronchial lung biopsies are only necessary to obtain in about quarter of patients.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

A rare entity of acquired idiopathic generalised anhidrosis which has been successfully treated with pulse steroid therapy: Does the histopathology predict the treatment response?

ÖKTEM Özdemir Ece, ÇANKAYA Şeyda, UYKUR Burak Abdullah, ERDEN Simsek Nazan, YULUG Burak

Acquired idiopathic generalised anhidrosis is an uncommon sweating disorder characterized by loss of sweating in the absence of any neurologic, metabolic or sweat gland abnormalities. Although some possible immunological and structural mechanisms have been proposed for this rare entity, the definitive pathophysiology is still un­clear. Despite some successfully treated cases with systemic corticosteroid application, the dose and route of steroid application are controversial. Here, we present a 41-year-old man with lack of genera­lised sweating who has been successfully treated with high dose pulse intravenous prednisolone. We have discussed his clinical and histopathological findings as well as the treatment options in view of the current literature.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

EEG-based connectivity in patients with partial seizures with and without generalization

DÖMÖTÖR Johanna, CLEMENS Béla, EMRI Miklós, PUSKÁS Szilvia, FEKETE István

Objective - to investigate the neurophysiological basis of secondary generalization of partial epileptic seizures. Patients and methods - inter-ictal, resting-state EEG functional connectivity (EEGfC) was evaluated and compared: patients with exclusively simple partial seizures (sp group) were compared to patients with simple partial and secondary generalized seizures (spsg group); patients with exclusively complex partial seizures (cp group) were compared to patients with cp and secondary generalized seizures (cpsg group); the collapsed sp+cp group (spcp) was compared to those who had exclusively secondary generalized seizures (sg group). EEGfC was computed from 21-channel waking EEG. 3 minutes of waking EEG background activity was analyzed by the LORETA Source Correlation (LSC) software. Current source density time series were computed for 23 pre-defined cortical regions (ROI) in each hemisphere, for the 1-25 Hz very narrow bands (1 Hz bandwidth). Thereafter Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between all pairs of ROI time series in the same hemisphere. Z-scored correlation coefficients were compared at the group level (t-tests and correction for multiple comparisons by local false discovery rate, FDR). Results - Statistically significant (corrected p<0.05) EEGfC differences emerged at specific frequencies (spsg > sg; cpsg > cp), and at many frequencies (sg > spcp). The findings indicated increased coupling between motor cortices and several non-motor areas in patients with partial and sg seizures as compared to patients with partial seizures and no sg seizures. Further findings suggested increased coupling between medial parietal-occipital areas (structural core of the cortex) and lateral hemispheric areas. Conclusion - increased inter-ictal EEGfC is associated with habitual occurrence of secondary generalized seizures.

Clinical Neuroscience

Risk factors for ischemic stroke and stroke subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease

GÜLER Siber, NAKUS Engin, UTKU Ufuk

Background - The aim of this study was to compare ischemic stroke subtypes with the effects of risk factors, the relationship between grades of kidney disease and the severity of stroke subtypes. Methods - The current study was designed retrospectively and performed with data of patients who were hospitalised due to ischemic stroke. We included 198 subjects who were diagnosed with ischemic stroke of Grade 3 and above with chronic kidney disease. Results - In our study were reported advanced age, coronary artery disease, moderate kidney disease as the most frequent risk factors for cardioembolic etiology. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking and alcohol consumption were the most frequent risk factors for large-artery disease. Female sex and anaemia were the most frequent risk factors for small-vessel disease. Dialysis and severe kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors in unknown etiologies, while male sex, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke and mild kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors for other etiologies. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were lower for small-vessel disease compared with other etiologies. This relation was statistically significant (p=0.002). Conclusion - In order to improve the prognosis in ischemic stroke with chronic kidney disease, the risk factors have to be recognised and the treatment options must be modified according to those risk factors.

Ca&Bone

[Calcium and vitamin D supplementation in daily practice in view of contraindications]

KOVÁCS LÁSZLÓ

[The current reimbursement regulations that came into effect this summer for the prevention and the treatment of osteoporosis require calcium and vitamin D supplementation in addition to antiporotic agents if appropriate conditions are met. In this paper, the author reviews those conditions that represent contraindications for calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Among these, the extremely rare vitamin D intoxication is mentioned and a detailed list of disorders resulting in hypercalcaemia is given with emphasis on the most common causes such as hypercalcaemia associated with malignancy and primary hyperparathyroidism. With hypercalcuria and renal stone disease, the diet low in calcium appears to have no effect on the outcome; moreover recent studies demonstrate beneficial effect of increased calcium intake, although the optimal calcium and vitamin D supplementation needs further clarification in these conditions. This review highlights the role of additional factors in increasing the risk such as hyperoxaluria, hyperuricosuria, hypocitraturia, as wells as the excessive protein and potassium-chloride intake or the pharmacological differences of various calcium supplements. The article underscores the use of activated vitamin D products in severe renal failure to prevent secondary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy. The new regulations represent a significant improvement in the therapy of patients with osteoporosis, however the individualized therapy and follow up, the good relationship between patient and physician contribute to the optimal therapeutic effects and to minimize the side effects.]