Lege Artis Medicinae

[County level mortality data of urogenital system in Hungary between 2010-2014]

KISS István, PAKSY András

MARCH 20, 2017

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2017;27(03)

[According to The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (10th Revision, ICD 10; XIV), urogenital diseases resulted in an average 910 yearly deaths in Hungary from 2010 through 2014, less than 1% of the cumulative mortality rate. Out of all urogenital conditions, kidney and bladder diseases were the leading cause of death, accounting for nearly 85 percent of all deaths in the examined period. It should be noted that mortality due to urogenital cancers, renovascular hypertonia, diabetic nephropathy, congenital malformations and pathologies related to childbirth and pregnancy are excluded from consideration in the present review. As the Hungarian Central Statistical Office does not disclose the causes of death by age and gender at its county-level data, this paper reports gender-specific mortality rates. Due to the fact that the county-level mortality rate of urogenital diseases is low and the yearly standard deviation is high, the five-year overall mortality rate of 2010-2014 is presented. Hungarian counties differ greatly in terms of mortality from urogenital diseases. The number of deaths per 100 000 population ranges between 6.74 in Békés county and 16.38 in Fejér county. Counties within the same region may exhibit substantially different mortality rates. An overall 7.01 deaths per 100 000 population was reported in Győr-Moson-Sopron county, whereas among residents of the neighbouring Vas county the rate was reported as 14.73 per 100 000 population. The observed variations prevail even when standardised mortality rates are compared and thus the differences in the counties’ age distributions are accounted for. Regional differences become more apparent when only the deaths caused by kidney diseases are analysed out of all urogenital pathologies. In this case, two- or threefold differences are observed between the respective Hungarian counties. Major disparities are still present between counties within the same region. For example, the number of deaths per 100.000 population is 3.74 in Hajdú-Bihar county, and 8.04 in Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok county, respectively. The diagnosis frequency of kidney diseases has a strong positive correlation with case fatality, but it may not fully account for all regional variations in mortality rates. Regional characteristics of dialytic care and the accessibility of dialytic facilities is not related to patient mortality. ]

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