Lege Artis Medicinae

[CHRONIC PAIN SYNDROMES - MYOFASCIAL PAIN SYNDROME]

BÁLINT Géza, MANDL Péter, FINCZICZKI Ágnes, BÁLINT Péter

DECEMBER 19, 2008

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2008;18(12)

[In the first part of their review about chronic pain syndromes the authors summarize our knowledge about the etiopathogenesis, pathology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of myofascial pain syndromes. It is emphasized that also pain of the internal organs, as well as musculoskeletal and connective tissue diseases may generate myofascial pain syndromes. The correct diagnosis of these syndromes is very important, for they respond poorly to simple analgesics, steroids or non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Exercise, physiotherapy, behavioral treatment, local injections, muscle relaxants, tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors are successful modalities of treatment.]

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