Lege Artis Medicinae

[Cataflam Art Salon]

NOVEMBER 19, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(11)

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[Depression in medical practice - the possibilities of diagnosis and treatment]

OSVÁTH Péter

[Nowadays, there is an increasing incidence of depressive mood disorders, so we have more and more depressed patients in everyday clinical practice. Unfortunately, in many cases, this is not recognized and thus the treatment of depressed patients is not adequately addressed. Untreated depression not only increases the burden of the patient and his environment, but leads to serious and dangerous psychic and somatic complications. However, with modern and complex psychopharmacological, psychotherapeutic and sociotherapeutic methods, depressive mood disorders can be effectively treated. In this paper I review the etiologic background, the characteristics of depressive mood disorders and the most important steps of making diagnosis, as well as the state of the art therapeutic options. Rapid recognition and effective treatment of depressive symptoms has important therapeutic and preventive significance, so today, besides psychiatrists, there is an increasing role for general practitioners and other specialists (internists, neurologists, etc.).]

Hungarian Radiology

[Diagnostic pitfalls and artifacts of multislice CT]

BARANYAI Tibor

[There is a spectacular development in diagnostic radiology in the last one and a half decades. State-of-the-art US, CT and MR appliances and the dynamic software developments has improved diagnostic safety by order of magnitude, which resulted in the reduction of possible errors and misinterpretations. The advent of MSCT resulted in shorter scanning times, the submillimeter collimation and the subsecond scan time improves the spatial resolution of the image, the motion artifacts are reduced and the evaluation of the parenchymal organs improves. However, the new technology of MSCT raises new questions. Due to faster data collection the acquisition time decreases, that is why the tracing of the contrast material must be accurately timed. The high contrast material density that appears suddenly in pulsing vessels makes a disturbing effect on its environment, thus making way to erroneous interpretation. The performance of a secondary reconstruction (2D and 3D reconstructions) may diminish the possibility of diagnostic pitfalls and artifacts. Reconstruction increments made from appropriately overlapping thin slices are required for good image quality and spatial resolution, otherwise the image quality is deteriorating, some vessels might “disappear”, they are not depicted. We are struggling with several problems using MIP CTangiography. The proper elimination of the bones, the improper selection of VOI (volume of interest) might lead to false positive result, and the assessment of small vessels might become impossible. The differentiation of soft plaque and vessel thrombus can also be a problem, and the hard plaque may imitate a constriction. The knowledge of breath and pulsating motion artifacts, beam-hardening artifacts and flow-related artifacts is essential. Differentiating difficulties during virtual endoscopy, the partial volumen effect, the interpretation of various post-operative conditions, the disturbing effects of implants may cause diagnostic and differential diagnostic problems. The author gives a summary of possible errors, misinterpretations and artifacts that may occur with the application of MSCT even if examination protocols are followed.]

Clinical Oncology

[Molecular diagnostics of brain tumors - an up-date]

REINIGER Lilla, HANZÉLY Zoltán, BÁLINT Katalin, TURÁNYI Eszter

[In recent years there have been major advancements in the understanding of molecular events driving brain tumor genesis and progression. Although state-of-the-art techniques are not widely available, many of the molecular discoveries lead to novel antibodies that can assist in identifying the major molecular subgroups by immunohistochemistry. Molecular informations will likely be incorporated into the next World Health Organization (WHO) classifi cation of central nervous system tumors, but clinical practice in many centres have already taken on the available informations and therapeutic decisions are made based on genetic/epigenetic information. In the adult population IDH, ATRX and 1p/19q codeletion studies help to defi ne molecular subgroups that correlate better with prognosis and therapeutic response than traditional histology based diagnosis. The KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene is a hallmark for pilocytic astrocytomas, while diffuse pediatric gliomas lack the IDH mutations and 1p/19q codeletions that are common in adult astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas. Uncommon in adults, Histone H3.3 mutations are pathognomic in pediatric brainstem malignant gliomas. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastomas have also been identifi ed, and a corresponding set of antibodies are ready to guide treatment decisions in those centres where molecular techniques are not available. These genetic and epigenetic events determine a tumor’s behaviour, and integrating this level of informations into neuropathology practice is essential to provide the best possible care to both pediatric and adult patients.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Management of bleeding from oesophageal and gastric varices]

JÓZSA Andrea, SZÉKELY Iván, SIMON János, MÁHR Árpád, HORVÁTH László, HORVÁTH Andrea, FEJES Roland, SZÉKELY András, SZABÓ Tamás, MADÁCSY László

[INTRODUCTION – Variceal haemorrhage from the oesophageal or gastric wall is a major cause of death in patients with chronic liver disease. Over the past two decades many new treatment modalities have been introduced in the management of variceal bleeding, such as emergency endoscopy, band ligation and postintervention observation of the bleeding patients in subintensive care units. This study presents the results of state-of-the-art therapy applied in our department, comparing them to published data. PATIENTS AND METHODS – Clinical records of patients with variceal haemorrhage admitted to our department between January 1st 2001 and December 31st 2004 were reviewed. Six-week mortality, incidence of recurrent bleeding, transfusion requirement and length of hospital stay were the main parameters analysed. RESULTS – A total of 228 admissions (191 patients) due to variceal bleeding were recorded in the study period. Cirrhosis was of alcoholic origin in 92% of patients. Upper endoscopy was performed in 94% of patients within 4 hours and endoscopic therapy was also applied in all but 7 patients. Octreotide was administered in 4 patients, and portosystemic shunt was performed in 1 patient. Primary endoscopic haemostasis was achieved in 85% of cases, while rebleeding rate was 31%. The mean length of total hospital stay was 10.6 days, including an average of 2.6 days in subintensive care units. The mean transfusion requirement was 3.75 units of packed red cells. Six-week mortality rate was 14.9%. CONCLUSION – In comparison to international data, the six-week mortality rate among our patients was substantially lower than that in earlier reports, and nearly equals with recent leading results.]