Lege Artis Medicinae

[Botero in Budapest]

FEBRUARY 20, 2011

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2011;21(02)

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Clinical Neuroscience

Fluoxetine use is associated with improved survival of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia: A retrospective case-control study

NÉMETH Klára Zsófia, SZÛCS Anna , VITRAI József , JUHÁSZ Dóra , NÉMETH Pál János , HOLLÓ András

We aimed to investigate the association between fluoxetine use and the survival of hospitalised coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia patients. This retrospective case-control study used data extracted from the medical records of adult patients hospitalised with moderate or severe COVID-19 pneumonia at the Uzsoki Teaching Hospital of the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary between 17 March and 22 April 2021. As a part of standard medical treatment, patients received anti-COVID-19 therapies as favipiravir, remdesivir, baricitinib or a combination of these drugs; and 110 of them received 20 mg fluoxetine capsules once daily as an adjuvant medication. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between fluoxetine use and mortality. For excluding a fluoxetine-selection bias potentially influencing our results, we compared baseline prognostic markers in the two groups treated versus not treated with fluoxetine. Out of the 269 participants, 205 (76.2%) survived and 64 (23.8%) died between days 2 and 28 after hospitalisation. Greater age (OR [95% CI] 1.08 [1.05–1.11], p<0.001), radiographic severity based on chest X-ray (OR [95% CI] 2.03 [1.27–3.25], p=0.003) and higher score of shortened National Early Warning Score (sNEWS) (OR [95% CI] 1.20 [1.01-1.43], p=0.04) were associated with higher mortality. Fluoxetine use was associated with an important (70%) decrease of mortality (OR [95% CI] 0.33 [0.16–0.68], p=0.002) compared to the non-fluoxetine group. Age, gender, LDH, CRP, and D-dimer levels, sNEWS, Chest X-ray score did not show statistical difference between the fluoxetine and non-fluoxetine groups supporting the reliability of our finding. Provisional to confirmation in randomised controlled studies, fluoxetine may be a potent treatment increasing the survival for COVID-19 pneumonia.

Clinical Neuroscience

[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

VASTAGH Ildikó, SZŐCS Ildikó, OBERFRANK Ferenc, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

Is stroke indeed a “Monday morning disease”?

FOLYOVICH András, BÉRES-MOLNÁR K Anna, GIMESI-ORSZÁGH Judit, KATONA Lajos, BICZÓ Dávid, VÖRÖS Károly, GŐBL Gábor, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

Introduction - The therapeutic time window of acute stroke is short. Decision on the use of intravenous thrombolysis is based on well-defined criteria. Any delay in the transport to a designated stroke centre decreases the odds of therapeutic success. In Hungary, the admission rate of stroke patients peaks on Monday, the number gradually decreasing by the end of the week. This phenomenon has long been suggested to be due to the lack of emergency care approach. According to the literature, however, returning to work following a holiday is a risk factor for acute stroke. A similar phenomenon is well-known in veterinary medicine, a condition in horses referred to as ‘Monday morning disease’. In our study, we analysed the distribution of admissions due to acute stroke by the day of the week in 4 independent data sources. Patients and methods - The number of patients admitted to the Szent János Hospital, Budapest, Hungary with stroke and that of emergency ambulance transports in the whole city of Budapest due to acute stroke were analysed in the period between January 1 and March 31, 2009. The distribution of thrombolytic interventions reflecting hospitalizations for hyperacute stroke was analysed based on data of the Szent János Hospital in 2009-2012, and on national data from 2006-2012. Descriptive statistics was used to present the data. The variation between daily admission was compared by chi-square test. Results - The proportion of daily admission of stroke patients admitted to the Szent János Hospital was the highest at the beginning of the week (18% on Monday, and 21% on Tuesday) and the lowest on the weekend (9% and 9% on Saturday and Sunday, respectively). The distribution of ambulance transports in Budapest due to acute stroke tended to be similar (15% and 15% on Monday and Tuesday, whereas 13% and 12% on Saturday and Sunday, respectively) on different days of the week. No such Monday peak could be observed in a single centre regarding thrombolytic interventions: 18% and 19% of the total of 80 thrombolytic interventions in the Szent János Hospital were performed on Monday and Sunday, respectively. At the national level the higher Monday rate is obvious: during a 7-year period 16.0%, 12.7%, and 13.5% of all thrombolytic interventions in Hungary were performed on Monday, Saturday and Sunday, respectively. Conclusion - Monday preference of stroke is not exclusively caused by the lack of emergency care approach, and the phenomenon is not consistent at the individual hospital level in cases undergoing thrombolysis.

Clinical Neuroscience

Population-based stroke screening days in the 12th district of Budapest in 2011 and 2016 - What have and what have not changed?

FOLYOVICH András, BOTOS Nóra, BALOGH Erzsébet, BAKOS Mária, HERTELENDY Anna, BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin

Introduction - Population-based screening is an option to identify persons at high risk for stroke. However it is associated with rather high expenses, necessitating the selection of effective methods that take local characteristics into account. The 12th district of Budapest has a long tradition of population-based screening for frequent and preventable diseases. The Szent János Hospital hosts an annual stroke screening day. In the present study, previously published data from the 2011 screening were compared with those obtained in 2016, looking for changes and tendencies throughout the examined period. Subjects and methods - The screening day was conducted in a generally similar way in 2011 and 2016. Similarly to the previous event, the program was organized on a Saturday, the call for the event was spread by the local newspaper. The crew composition was the same. As regards the components of the screening (currently including general history taking, risk status assessment, blood pressure measurement, BMI assessment, cholesterol and blood glucose tests, carotid duplex ultrasonography, and ophthalmological examination), the only difference was the absence of cardiologic examination (it was conducted on an independent day). The anonymous data sheet was the same. Results - The number of participants in the 2016 event was 33, to provide more comfortable conditions. The female predominance was slightly less pronounced but was still present in 2016 (60.6% vs. 72.9%). The mean age became substantially higher (71.2 y vs. 62.9 y). The ratios of participants with higher level of education (97% vs. 94%) and those who are married were still remarkable. The most frequent risk factors were the same; however the ratio of participants with hypertension, ‘other heart disease’, and diabetes increased, whereas that of with hyperlipidemia and obesity decreased. The incidence of atrial fibrillation was unaltered. None of the participants in 2016 admitted smoking (previously this ratio was 20.8%) or drinking heavily. The findings of the carotid ultrasonography revealed a more favorable vascular status. Ophthalmological assessments (predominantly hypertensive alterations on fundoscopy) revealed that the pathological vs. physiological ratio switched to 1:2 from 2:1. The final evaluation of the screening program likewise demonstrated an improved overall state of health of the population. Conclusions - We observed a more favorable stroke risk status of the population in 2016. Whether it is indeed a tendency unknown at present. The role of the local media in calling for screening is still decisive, and the cohesive power of the family is important.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Assessment of health related quality of life among epileptic patients in the context of coping strategies and subjective disease perception]

KOVÁTS Daniella, CSÁSZÁR-NAGY Noémi, JUHOS Vera, SALLAY Viola, BÉKÉS Judit, FABÓ Dániel, KELEMEN Anna, KURIMAY Tamás

[Purpose – Psychosocial condition and life quality of epileptic patients are greatly determined by the existence of the disease-related comorbid disorders, like depression, anxiety, and the subjective disease perception, as well as the neuropsychological consequences of the seizures. (Whitehead et al. 2015; Goldstein et al. 2005). It has been examined in patients living with epilepsy how subjective disease perception and coping strategies influence life quality, comorbid depression and the condition of anxiety. Methods – Study patients were asked to fill in a self-completion questionnaire, which examined their psychosocial condition (HADS, Beck Depression Scale), life quality (Qolie-31), coping strategies (FKV-LIS), and subjective disease perception (IPQ-R), as well as sociodemographic and disease variables. The subjects of the study: the data of epileptic patients between the age of 18 to 70 was recorded. Patients were selected from the adult outpatients of a national centre, a regional hospital and two private health care centres located in Budapest. Results – Based on the multiple regression analysis. Beck’s depression (b coefficient=-0.351, t=-4.703, p<0.001**). Depressive coping strategy (FKV Dep) (b coefficient = -0.235, t=-3.123, p=0.002**). Subjective health perception (b coefficient =0.232. t=3.643, p<0.001**). Sex (women; b coefficient =-0.162, t=-3.008, p=0.003**). IPQ consequences (b coefficient =-0.161, t=-2.572, p=0.012*). Active coping strategy (FKV Act; b coefficient =0.146, t=2.572, p=0.012*). Type of seizure (b coefficient =-0.138, t=-2.527, p=0.013*), and Sleep quality (b coefficient =-0.125, t=-1.995, p=0.049) explain some 75.6% of the variance of life quality’s total score (model3: F=33.333, p<0.001**. adjusted R2=0.733). Conclusions – Among the factors of the subjective disease perception (IPQ-R), the physical, mental and social consequences play the most important role. Similarly, the impact of negative emotional representation, as well as the erratic nature of the seizures are decisive. Emotional representation, cyclicity and disease coherence have an important role in coping with disease-related negative emotions. ]