Lege Artis Medicinae

[Botero in Budapest]

FEBRUARY 20, 2011

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2011;21(02)

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[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

VASTAGH Ildikó, SZŐCS Ildikó, OBERFRANK Ferenc, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Role of the intraoperative electrical brain stimulation in conserving the speech and language function in neurosurgical operations of awake patients]

ERÕSS Loránd, FEKETE Gábor, ENTZ László, FABÓ Dániel, BORBÉLY Csaba, KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf, ANDREJKOVICS Mónika, CZIRJÁK Sándor, FEDORCSÁK Imre, NOVÁK László, BOGNÁR László

[Aim of the study - To summarize the results gained with awake craniotomies, which were performed in either low grade glioma patients or epilepsy surgical patients whose tumor or epileptogenic zone, was in the vicinity of eloquent, mostly language, cortices. Patient selection and methods - In our retrospective study we selected 16 patients who were operated awake between 1999-2011 at the Neurosurgical Department of MÁV Kórház Budapest, or at the National Institute of Neurosciences in Budapest, or at the Neurosurgical Department of the University of Debrecen in Debrecen. In the presurgical evaluation if it was possible we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging, tractography and detailed neuropsychological testing. At the National Institute of Neurosciences all patients were operated with the aid of MR guided neuronavigation. Results - Anesthesia was carried out without complications in all of the 16 cases. Monitoring of sleep deepness has significantly contributed to the safety of anesthesia during the superficial anesthezied states of the operation. The intraoperative neuropsychological tasks used for testing language were sensitive enough to judge the little disturbances in speech during stimulation. Stimulation evoked seizures could be adequately managed during surgery and did not influence the outcome of the procedures. The use of neuronavigation helped significantly by planning the optimal place for the craniotomy and by intraoperative orientation. Conclusions - Awake craniotomies require well practiced surgical teams, which requires the cooperation of neuro-anesthesiologits, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologist and electrophysiologists. It has two goals, first to reduce the time of surgery to minimize surgical complications, secondly the detailed intraoperative mapping of cognitive and motor functions to avoid any neurological deficit. The intraoperative anatomical data provided by the neuronavigation and the functional data provided by awake intraoperative stimulation of the patient together serve the safety of the patient which is essential in the neurologically minimal invasive neurosurgical approach of the 21st century.]

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[Marc Chagall and Imre Ámos in Budapest ]

NAGY Zsuzsanna

Hungarian Radiology

[X-ray examination of paintings]

SZABÓ Éva, SZENTKIRÁLYI Miklós

[INTRODUCTION - After the discovery of X-ray it was not only used for medical purposes, but also to study the internal structure of various objects. The X-ray examination can be applied not only to examine paintings, but other works of art. METHODS AND RESULTS - The rontgenograms are made by industrial film without any screen in the museum. In case of paintings soft-beam examination technique was used. The basic principle of the X-ray examination of different paintings is based on the presence of different atomic number in different paints. Authors after the examination of four paintings achieved a significant finding. In these paintings the stylistic and structural features of the pictures, injuries, originality, changes in the composition during the work of the artist can be studied. CONCLUSIONS - Recordings made by an industrial radiological equipment in the Museum of Fine Arts (Budapest) are helpful in the restorer work.]

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BENEDEK Zsófia, KRENYÁCZ Éva

[In this review, we compared economic and physiological observations reported in the literature that are related to laparoscopic versus conventional colorectal surgery. Our study group has modeled the patient journey of those with colorectal disease, and analysed the accounting and controlling data of an impatient institution in Budapest for various types of colorectal interventions. We compared the costs determined for laparoscopic and conventional colorectal surgery and the actual costs spent by the inpatient care institution with financing data of the National Health Insurance Fund. On the basis of our study, we conclude that in Hungary colorectal surgery performed by laparoscopy is much more expensive that conventional surgery as the cost of the operating room - in particular, the disposable tools - is high and currently it is not financed as a separate intervention type. In case of colorectal diseases, laparoscopic and traditional interventions have not been differentiated, observed and compared yet.]