Lege Artis Medicinae

[Autoimmune pancreatitis]

JAKAB Lajos

NOVEMBER 19, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(11)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[In Memoriam Sándor Gerő (1904-1992)]

EMED Alexander

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Riddle]

GRÉTSY Zsombor

Lege Artis Medicinae

[I Still Have So Much to Do... A Discussion with Éva Csatár MD]

VARGA Brigitta

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Some Legal Aspects of Medical Practice and Viral Infections]

BÁLINT Tamás

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Rossini’s Mood Disorder]

KÖVES Péter

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Electrophysiological investigation for autonomic dysfunction in patients with myasthenia gravis: A prospective study

NALBANTOGLU Mecbure, AKALIN Ali Mehmet, GUNDUZ Aysegul, KIZILTAN Meral

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Autonomic dysfunction is not a commonly known association with MG. We conducted this study to evaluate autonomic functions in MG & subgroups and to investigate the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. This study comprised 30 autoimmune MG patients and 30 healthy volunteers. Autonomic tests including sympathetic skin response (SSR) and R-R interval variation analysis (RRIV) was carried out. The tests were performed two times for patients who were under acetylcholinesterase inhibitors during the current assessment. The RRIV rise during hyperventilation was better (p=0.006) and Valsalva ratio (p=0.039) was lower in control group. The SSR amplitudes were lower thereafter drug intake (p=0.030). As much as time went by after drug administration prolonged SSR latencies were obtained (p=0.043).Valsalva ratio was lower in the AchR antibody negative group (p=0.033). The findings showed that both ocular/generalized MG patients have a subclinical parasympathetic abnormality prominent in the AchR antibody negative group and pyridostigmine has a peripheral sympathetic cholinergic noncumulative effect.

Clinical Neuroscience

Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to a jugular foramen schwannoma

ÖZTOP-CAKMAK Özgür, VANLI-YAVUZ Ebru, AYGÜN Serhat, BASTAN Birgül, EGEMEN Emrah, SOLAROGLU Ihsan, GURSOY-OZDEMIR Yesemin

Introduction – Although the involvement of the hypoglossal nerve together with other cranial nerves is common in several pathological conditions of the brain, particularly the brainstem, isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy is a rare condition and a diagnostic challenge. Case presentation – The presented patient arrived to the hospital with a history of slurred speech and an uncomfortable sensation on his tongue. Neurological examination showed left-sided hemiatrophy of the tongue with fasciculations and deviation towards the left side during protrusion. Based on the clinical and MRI findings, a diagnosis of hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was made. Discussion – Hypoglossal nerve palsy may arise from multiple causes such as trauma, infections, neoplasms, and endocrine, autoimmune and vascular pathologies. In our case, the isolated involvement of the hypoglossal nerve was at the skull base segment, where the damage to the hypoglossal nerve may occur mostly due to metastasis, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, nerve sheath tumors and glomus tumors. Conclusion – Because of the complexity of the region’s anatomy, the patient diagnosed with hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was referred for gamma knife radiosurgery.

Clinical Neuroscience

Myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or both?

ERDOGAN Cagdas, TEKIN Selma, ÜNLÜTÜRK Zeynep, GEDIK Korkut Derya

Myasthenia gravis (MG) and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) are autoimmune disorders that may cause weakness in the extremities. The coexistence of MG and GBS in the same patient has rarely been reported previously. A 52-year-old male presenting with ptosis of the left eye that worsened with fatigue, especially toward evening, was evaluated in our outpatient department. His acetylcholine receptor antibody results were positive, supporting the diagnosis of MG. His medical history revealed a post-infectious acute onset of weakness in four extremities, difficulty in swallowing and respiratory failure, which was compatible with a myasthenic crisis; however, his nerve conduction studies and albuminocytologic dissociation at the time were compatible with GBS. With this case report, we aimed to mention this rare coincidental state, discuss possible diagnoses and review all other similar cases in the literature with their main features.

Clinical Neuroscience

[LADA type diabetes, celiac diasease, cerebellar ataxia and stiff person syndrome. A rare association of autoimmune disorders]

SOÓS Zsuzsanna, SALAMON Mónika, ERDEI Katalin, KASZÁS Nóra, FOLYOVICH András, SZŰCS Anna, BARCS Gábor, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna, SKALICZKI József, VADASDI Károly, WINKLER Gábor

[Celiac disease - in its typical form - is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy with typical clinical symptoms that develops against gliadin content of cereal grains, and is often associated with other autoimmune diseases. In cases of atypical manifestation classic symptoms may be absent or mild, and extra-intestinal symptoms or associated syndromes dominate clinical picture. The authors present a longitudinal follow-up of such a case. A 63-years old woman was diagnosed with epilepsy at the age of 19, and with progressive limb ataxia at the age of 36, which was initially thought to be caused by cerebellar atrophy, later probably by stiff person syndrome. At the age 59, her diabetes mellitus manifested with type 2 diabetic phenotype, but based on GAD positivity later was reclassified as type 1 diabetes. Only the last check-up discovered the celiac disease, retrospectively explaining the entire disease course and neurological symptoms. By presenting this case, the authors would like to draw attention to the fact that one should think of the possibility of celiac disease when cerebellar ataxia, progressive neurological symptoms and diabetes are present at the same time. An early diagnosis may help to delay the progression of disease and help better treatment.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NMDA-receptor associated encephalitis in a woman with mature cystic ovarian teratoma

VANYA Melinda, FÜVESI Judit, KOVÁCS A. Zoltán, GORGORAPTIS Nikos, SALEK-HADDADI Afram, KOVÁCS LÁSZLÓ, BÁRTFAI György

Introduction - N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) antibody-associated encephalitis has been reported in the international neurological literature to be associated with mature or immature ovarian teratomas (OTs). However, few cases of encephalitis were diagnosed in Hungary. In 2011 Hollody et al. described the first case of anti-NMDA receptor associated encephalitis in Hungary. Objective - Our aim was to present a case of NMDA-R antibody-mediated encephalitis in a woman with OT thereby providing information facilitating diagnosis of OT in women, who present with symptoms of encephalitis. Case - We report the case of a 25 year-old women, who developed NMDA-R -antibody associated autoimmune encephalitis and who displayed confusion, disorientation, a behavioural disturbance with agitation and features of paranoia and at least one reported generalized tonic clonic seizure and orofacial dyskinesia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a functional ovarian cyst measuring 3.3 cm, which was removed surgically and demonstrated histologically to be a mature cystic OT. The serum was positive for antibodies to NMDA receptors. Following intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, oophorectomy and a 5-day course of plasma exchange, followed by corticosteroid and azathioprine immunosuppressive therapy, the patient displayed a significant clinical improvement. Conclusion - Cystic teratomas are common benign ovarian lesions in women of reproductive age. Although the association of OTs and NMDA-R antibody-associated encephalitis has been described in the international neurological literature, this relationship needs to be considered from on the interdisciplinary aspect by the health care providers.