Lege Artis Medicinae

[Ask your doctor!]

KRAMER Imre

MAY 20, 2010

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2010;20(05)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Etiology and Treatment of Childhood]

SMOLLER W. Jordan

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Painting and Eternity – Time in Margitte’s Art]

TÚRY Ferenc

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Hot Topics – Joining Efforts to Save Hungarian Psychiatry – A Discussion with Judit Harangozó MD]

NAGY Zsuzsanna

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Haitian Fates]

NAGY Zsuzsa

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Haemophilia today]

KARDOS Mária

[Haemophilia is the most well-known inherited bleeding disorder, which has an X-linked inheritance and affects men. Its severity is classified on the basis of the amount of circulating functional clotting factors: patients with values < 1% have severe disease, those with values of 1-5% have moderate disease, and those with values >5% are classified as having mild disease. Severe haemophilia is characterised by frequent, spontaneous bleeding episodes, whereas in those with moderate or mild haemophilia, bleeding is only caused by trauma or surgery. Although bleeding can occur almost anywhere, the most common clinical manifestation is haemarthrosis. Haemophilic arthrpathy that develops as a result of repeated episodes of joint haemorrhage is the most important factor of morbidity in those with haemophilia. Intravenous replacement of the missing clotting factor is used to treat and prevent bleeding episodes. Controlled therapy at home that provides immediate replacement is the optimal early approach. Prophylaxis includes administration of clotting factors at regular intervals to prevent bleeding, which must be the main goal of management until a cure becomes available. The development of inhibitors during treatment is the most significant complication of factor replacement, and management of bleeding in patients with such inhibitors is difficult.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Second game, 37th move and Fourth game 78th move]

VOKÓ Zoltán

[What has Go to do with making clinical decisions? One of the greatest intellectual challenges of bedside medicine is making decisions under uncertainty. Besides the psychological traps of traditionally intuitive and heuristic medical decision making, lack of information, scarce resources and characteristics of doctor-patient relationship contribute equally to this uncertainty. Formal, mathematical model based analysis of decisions used widely in developing clinical guidelines and in health technology assessment provides a good tool in theoretical terms to avoid pitfalls of intuitive decision making. Nevertheless it can be hardly used in individual situations and most physicians dislike it as well. This method, however, has its own limitations, especially while tailoring individual decisions, under inclusion of potential lack of input data used for calculations, or its large imprecision, and the low capability of the current mathematical models to represent the full complexity and variability of processes in complex systems. Nevertheless, clinical decision support systems can be helpful in the individual decision making of physicians if they are well integrated in the health information systems, and do not break down the physicians’ autonomy of making decisions. Classical decision support systems are knowledge based and rely on system of rules and problem specific algorithms. They are utilized widely from health administration to image processing. The current information revolution created the so-called artificial intelligence by machine learning methods, i.e. machines can learn indeed. This new generation of artificial intelligence is not based on particular system of rules but on neuronal networks teaching themselves by huge databases and general learning algorithms. This type of artificial intelligence outperforms humans already in certain fields like chess, Go, or aerial combat. Its development is full of challenges and threats, while it presents a technological breakthrough, which cannot be stopped and will transform our world. Its development and application has already started also in the healthcare. Health professionals must participate in this development to steer it into the right direction. Lee Sedol, 18-times Go world champion retired three years after his historical defeat from AlphaGo artificial intelligence, be­cause “Even if I become the No. 1, there is an entity that cannot be defeated”. It is our great luck that we do not need to compete or defeat it, we must ensure instead that it would be safe and trustworthy, and in collaboration with humans this entity would make healthcare more effective and efficient. ]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[VITAMIN D TREATMENT: HORMONE THERAPY FOR PATIENTS WHO NEED IT OR SIMPLY A SUPPLEMENTATION FOR EVERYONE?]

SPEER Gábor

[Various medical associations issue different recommendations for the prevention and treatment of vitamin D deficiency. These significant differences are partly explained by the different definition of normal vitamin D level and the use of completely different mathematical models to predict the increase in vitamin D level as a response to therapy. According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the target vitamin D level is 20 ng/ml, whereas the Endocrine Society (ES) recommends 30 ng/m as the miminum target value. According to the ES, a 1 ng/ml increase of vitamin D level can be reached by a daily intake of 100 NE, while the IOM recommends 3.6 ng/ml. Moreover, the IOM states that the effect of therapy on serum level is nonlinear. These differences show that the ES and IOM have different views on the risk of adverse effects. The IOM recommends 400 IU vitamin D daily for children younger than 1 year, 800 IU for those above 70 years and 600 IU/per day for everyone else. The ES recommend 400-1000 IU daily for all infants and 1500- 2000 IU for adults. Screening, however, is not recommended by either society. To decrease uncertainty concerning the side effects of higher-dose vitamin D treatment, it is important to understand, use and support the function of the pharmacovigilance system of the pharmaceutical industry that manufactures and markets various (prescription, over-the-counter) preparations. This is what the author aims to highlight in the second part of this article. Using this system, both the doctor and the patient can help support and accept the justification of higher-dose vitamin D therapy.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The Editors Ask, the Expert Responds]

CSÁSZÁR Albert

Clinical Oncology

[Actual place and role of communication in Hungarian oncology]

MUSZBEK Katalin, GAAL Ilona

[The move to shared decision model from the patriarchal model of doctor-patient relationship is a communication challenge for doctors and patients as well. Communication is extremely important in Oncology, because the suggestive effect of every action of doctors and nurses is outstanding in this fi eld of healthcare. This burden has to urge professionals to self-improvement. One of the most important success of the Doctor-Patient Relationship program of the Hungarian Hospice Foundation since its launch in 2014 is the statement of two clinical centres on the importance of communication skills in everyday praxis, and engaging themselves in self-improvement. The successful cooperation also depends on patients and their care-givers not just on professionals. To gain all the necessary information is a learning process for them; even as to fi nd out the depth of information and decision level they wish. The patient who is satisfied with his or her own communication in healthcare is less distressed than the one who feels like adrifting. That gives the sense of achievement to professionals as well.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Informations for the candidates of the title of ”Doctor of the Hungarian Academy of Science”]

VÉCSEI László