Lege Artis Medicinae

[Apoplexia in medulla oblongata]

KRUTSAY Miklós, HALUSZ Irma

SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2011;21(08-09)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Data on blood pressure over two years in resistant hypertensive patients with lett brain stem microvascular decompression]

FEJES Imola, VÖRÖS Erika, BARZÓ Pál, ÁBRAHÁM György, LÉGRÁDY Péter

[In the background of resistant hypertension (RHT) the neurovascular pulsatile compression (NVPC) of the left rostral ventrolateral medulla may play a role. In these cases a microvascular decompression (MVD) may decrease the blood pressure (BP). The aim of this work was to investigate how the BP has changed after the MVD in the operated patients recorded at the farthest time from the MVD up to maximum 31 December 2016. We have retrospectively collected data from 9 patients whose follow-up data fór 2 years has already been published earlier. Data collection was carried out from the patient register program of the University of Szeged Albert-Szent Györgyi Clinical Centre. The MVDs were performed between 2000 and 2004. The mean follow-up time was 11.1±4.6 years. Both the systolic and the diastolic BPs were significantly lower at the time of last record compared to the BPs at the time of MVD (systolic BP 211±40 vs. 135±20 mmHg, p=0.003; diastolic BP 116±17 vs. 81±14 mmHg, p=0.007). Last recorded BPs compared to the 24-month data alsó were lower bút nőt signffi- cantly (systolic BP 148±32 vs. 135±20 mmHg, p=0.25; diastolic BP 96 vs. 85 mmHg, p=0.11). The mean number of antihypertensives at the last Office visít was nőt sig- nificantly higher compared to MVD (5.9±1.4 vs. 6.3±1.5; p=0.5) bút signfficantly increased compared to MVD +1 month data (4.7±0.9vs. 6.3±1.5; p=0.03). These results confirmed our previous opinion that in severe RHT nőt respond- ing to conventional therapy an MVD of the left side NVPC could be a therapeutic option and may guarantee a long-lasting BP reduction. Evén if the number of antihypertensives increased in the meantime, as they still responded better to therapy. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Evidence for the expression of parathyroid hormone 2 receptor in the human brainstem (in English language)]

BAGÓ G. Attila, PALKOVITS Miklós, USDIN B. Ted, SERESS László, DOBOLYI Árpád

[Background and purpose - The parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) is a G protein coupled receptor. Pharmacological and anatomical evidence suggests that the recently identified tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues is, and parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide are not, its endogenous ligand. Initial functional studies suggest that the PTH2R is involved in the regulation of viscerosensory information processing. As a first step towards clinical applications, herein we describe the presence of the PTH2R in the human brainstem. Material and methods - Total RNA was isolated from postmortem human cortical and brainstem samples for RT-PCR. Good quality RNA, as assessed on formaldehyde gel, was reverse transcribed. The combined cDNA products were used as template in PCR reactions with primer pairs specific for the human PTH2R. In addition, PTH2R immunolabelling was performed on free floating sections of the human medulla oblongata using fluorescent amplification immunochemistry. Results - Specific bands in the RT-PCR experiments and sequencing of PCR products demonstrated the expression of PTH2R mRNA in the human brainstem. A high density of PTH2R-immunoreactive fibers was found in brain regions of the medulla oblongata including the nucleus of the solitary tract, the spinal trigeminal nucleus, and the dorsal reticular nucleus of the medulla. Conclusion - Independent demonstration of the presence of PTH2R mRNA and immunoreactivity supports the specific expression of the PTH2R in the human brainstem. The distribution of PTH2R-immunoreactive fibers in viscerosensory brain regions is similar to that reported in mouse and rat suggesting a similar role of the PTH2R in human as in rodents. This finding will have important implications when experimental data obtained on the function of the TIP39-PTH2R neuromodulator system in rodents are to be utilized in human.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[SUCCESSFULL SURGICAL REMOVAL OF A MESENCEPHALIC CAVERNOUS ANGIOMA, WHICH WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR PROGRESSIVE NEUROLOGICAL DEFICITS]

ZSOLDOS Tamás, MOLNÁR Anna, JÁNOSSY Ágota, KUNCZ Ádám, NAGY Ernő, DEÁK Gábor, BARZÓ Pál

[Cavernous angiomas comprise 5-10% of all vascular malformations in the central nervous system, occuring most frequently in the supratentorial region, and 20% of them in the brain stem. According to literature, brain stem cavernous angiomas occur most frequently in the pons (60%), and equally in the mesencephalon (20%) and in medulla oblongata. In clinical evaluation the authors describe the successful removal of a mesencephalic cavernous angioma causing progressive neurological deficits and symptoms. The authors present a case of a 51 year old female, who had developed 1 year prior to her admittance: fatigue, weakness in the right upper limb and fingers, right lower limb ataxia. One month later, her lower right limb developed sensory deficits. The first neurological exploration indicated dysarthria, moderate facial and right hemiparesis, hemihypaesthesia and ataxia. CT and MR imaging indicated multilobulated cavernomas in the mesencephalon. After conservative treatment the patient became almost symptom free, and thus neurosurgical treatment was not discussed. Later on her symptoms fluctuated, but after 6 month she suddenly developed progressive right hemiparesis, right facial weakness, serious dysphasia, and emotional incontinence combined with continuous spastic sobbings. The controll MRI showed enlargement of the cavernomas and new extravasation. Surgery was indicated for removing the cavernomas. The left infratentorial, supracerebellar approach revealed a blood engorged cavernoma in the center of the mesencephalon, almost dividing it. The cavernomas and accompanying haematoma was exstirpated. The patient's neurological symptoms rapidly improved after surgery, her dysphasia as well as motor weakness have disappeared. Six days after surgery, we discharged a neurologically symptomless and self-supporting patient. The literature and the presented case indicates that the correct timing and proper surgery allows brain stem cavernomas to be safely removed, or significantly bated, which results in the massive regression of neurological symptoms.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Anesthesia for medulla oblongata surgery

KORENCHY Mária, MOLNÁR Mária, KOVÁCS Klára, FUTÓ Judit

Hazards to patients undergoing brainstem operati­ons include venous air embolisation, hypoten­sion, vital sign changes and specific cranial nerve injury. Except for vital sign changes, these hazards are widely discussed in various handbooks and ar­ticles. Vital sign changes may result either from massive venous air embolism or bramstem compres­sion caused by surgical manipulation. If the opera­ted area is very close to the vasomotor center, even the most careful manipulation can cause extreme bradycardia with hypotension. These perilous chan­ges frequently keep the surgeon from continuing the operation. Transitional pacemaker therapy can be used du­ring these types of operations to prevent critical cardiac arrests.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[NEUROVASCULAR COMPRESSION IN THE MEDULLA OBLONGATA AS A CAUSE OF RESISTANT HYPERTENSION - THOUGHTS APROPOS OF A PATIENT]

KOVÁTS László, BRETUS Angelika, CSUTAK Kinga, NAGY Gyöngyi, GASZTONYI Beáta

[INTRODUCTION - The vasomotor centre, the central regulator of the cardiovascular system, is localised in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata. Irritation of this area and/or of the ninth and tenth cranial nerves (that are involved both in the afferent and efferent pathways of the baroreceptor reflex) causes sympathetic hyperactivity, which in some cases leads to severe resistant hypertension. A common underlying cause of this is pulsatile neurovascular compression, a vascular malformation rarely sought for. CASE REPORT - The authors present the case of a middle-aged woman with what had been considered “essential” hypertension. Magnetic resonance angiography showed vascular compression of the medulla oblongata and the departing left ninth and tenth cranial nerves as the cause of her hypertension. CONCLUSIONS - After a literature review the authors draw the attention to this rarely identified cause of resistant hypertension and to the difficulties of its diagnosis.]